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The speed at which the business world communicates and moves — and the resulting globalization — has made for an increasingly competitive landscape. Today’s business leaders are faced with more challenging and complex decisions than ever before, and are given less time and less complete information to make those decisions. Consequently, the ways in which business schools cultivate talent and generate ideas that bridge theory and practice must also evolve.

Columbia Business School’s new facilities — designed by renowned New York architecture firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with FXFowle — will reflect the fast-paced, high-tech, and highly social character of business in the 21st century. Business culture has been evolving away from the hierarchies that dominated organizations in past; instead, organizations are moving toward more horizontal, collaborative models, and in order to maintain its position at the forefront of graduate business education, the School must inhabit a physical space that facilitates and encourages:

  • The development of social intelligence–based skills, such as leadership, management, teamwork, and negotiation.
  • The creation and strengthening of social networks among students, faculty members, alumni, and business practitioners
  • The integration of cutting-edge technology into teaching and research

Similarly, faculty researchers understand that they must work cross-functionally in order to ensure innovation and relevance to business practice, particularly in multidisciplinary, problem-solving areas such as negotiations and decision making or strategy.

The construction of state-of-the-art facilities therefore offers Columbia Business School a unique opportunity to create spaces that lend themselves to a variety of uses, and that foster a deep sense of community — spaces where students, faculty members, and external constituents can gather and exchange ideas. In effect, the new campus will unlock the full potential of Columbia Business School, providing the necessary underpinning for the ongoing transformation of the School’s programs and the growth of its intellectual capital.

 

Flu Shots: Free & On Campus

Columbia Business School students, faculty, and staff members can receive a free flu shot in Uris Hall on October 23.

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All you need to do is bring your University ID card. No appointments are needed—shots are provided on a first-come, first-served basis.

Uris Hall, Hepburn Lounge
Thursday, October 23, 2014
11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

If you can't make it, there are other Morningside Campus locations and times. Visit Columbia Health for the complete listing.

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The Curl Ideas to wrap your mind around

5 Key Concepts For Every Chief Operating Officer

Alexander Tuff '03 discusses five key concepts every Chief Operating Officer should know.

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Startups for a Better World

More and more alumni entrepreneurs are launching ventures to serve the greater good.

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Columbia Business School Professor Predicts How Changes in Banking Laws Could Fuel Emerging Economies of Tomorrow

New research tracks emerging countries’ economics activity after law changes and finds a boost in access to credit; increase in employment rate; increase in productivity and sales for firms

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Power Isn't Enough: Study Reveals the Missing Link for Effective Leadership

New research from Columbia Business School shows that powerful leaders fail to listen properly and take others’ accounts into perspective, jeopardizing the impact they could have

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How Can You Be Entrepreneurial in Any Organization?

Vince Ponzo '03 demystifies the entrepreneurial mindset.

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Why China's Bubble Won't Burst

Fundamentals that aren't going away give China a shot at sustained high growth for the foreseeable future.

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Modi's Five Waves of Change

Each wave has the potential to boost India's GDP by at least a half percentage point, says Adil Zainulbhai, chairman of the new Quality Council of India.

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The Age of Vulnerability

In the United States, upward mobility is more myth than reality, says Nobel laureate Joseph E. Stiglitz. Downward mobility and vulnerability, however, is a widely shared experience.

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Angel Investing: The New Alternative Asset

Carefully selected and managed portfolios of personal angel investments can produce an average annual return of more than 25 percent.

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