MENU

You are here

Master Classes

Finding Opportunity in a Changing Environment

Master Classes are hands-on, project-based electives designed to challenge second-year MBA students to master core concepts by applying them to contemporary business problems. Projects require students to make managerial decisions or recommendations on real-world problems companies need solved. Classes are integrally tied to external organizations that evaluate — and many times adopt — students’ recommendations.

Each Master Class focuses on a specific industry context such as consulting, real estate, or entrepreneurship and draws significant input from the professional community via interaction with student team projects and project sponsors, guest speakers, adjunct faculty members, and alumni participation. With these substantial projects and practitioner involvement, Master Classes provide students with a unique bridge between MBA theory and real-world practice.

Students: Learn by Doing

The Master Class program creates a bridge between Columbia Business School's highly acclaimed MBA and EMBA academic environment and real-world business experience by providing an opportunity for second-year students to put their acquired MBA knowledge into practice. In essence, to learn by doing.

For students, Master Classes are demanding, requiring a high level of commitment both inside and outside the classroom. Integrated learning coupled with extensive field work will be rewarded with a host of professional contacts and real-world experience, enabling students to expand their educational experiences beyond the classroom into the business community they are about to join.

Alumni: Reconnect with the School

For alumni, Master Classes are a great opportunity to reconnect with the School and become involved with students and faculty - and a very exciting program.

A minimum of 60 percent of each semester-long Master Class is dedicated to giving students and “real world” businesses an opportunity to collaborate on real-time issues facing our project sponsors’ organizations. In these hands-on, project-driven classes, teams of four to six second-year students are mentored by Columbia faculty and industry professionals in creating actionable strategies and/or recommendations for participating business partners. As students gain real-world experience, project sponsors gain high-level solutions.

Becoming a project sponsor is one avenue of involvement but we are open to hearing about other ways you’d like to contribute.

FEATURED HASHTAGS

Use these tags to follow the conversation

The tag to use for tweets about the Columbia Business School experience.

The new way to follow the Columbia Business School alumni conversation.


 CONNECT ONLINE to watch the conversation unfold.

 

News & Ideas

Attendance at Reunion 2015 Sets New Record

A record-breaking 2,500 alumni, guests, faculty and staff members, and students attended this year’s Reunion Weekend, which took place April 17–19.

Read More >

The Beginning of a Beautiful Friendship

Your former classmate might be the perfect business partner.

Read More >

Columbia Business School Professor Predicts How Changes in Banking Laws Could Fuel Emerging Economies of Tomorrow

New research tracks emerging countries’ economics activity after law changes and finds a boost in access to credit; increase in employment rate; increase in productivity and sales for firms

Read More >

How India Can Build Infrastructure

Rajiv Lall, executive chairman of the Infrastructure Development Corp. in India, says public/private partnerships won’t cut it.

Read More >

Chris Borland Makes the Hard Choice to Go Long

Chris Borland’s dramatic decision to retire at age 24 can teach us all something about the way we value the present and make hard decisions about the future.

photo ©Steve Schar/Flickr


Read More >

Eight Controversial Practices in the New Stock Market

New Research from Columbia Business School Makes Recommendations on How Regulators Should Intervene—If At All

Read More >

Clinton's 2016 Logo "Fail" Not Likely to Lose Voters

Criticism of the campaign logo dominated social media conversations around Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential bid. But logos are just a small part of a brand, and by the time election day rolls around, #logogate is likely to be long forgotten.

Read More >

Executive in Residence Jack Mitchell: Hug Your Customers

At Mitchells Family of Stores, a three-generation family clothing business, knowing the customer is the modus operandi.

Read More >

Damon Phillips to Serve as Co-Director of Tamer Center

In his new role, Professor Phillips will lead research and curriculum, as well as develop connections and support, for the Tamer Center.

Read More >