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Conferences & Workshops 2005

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U.S. Military Presence in Northeast Asia:

Providing Security for Economic Prosperity

Wednesday,  28 September 2005
This event was co-sponsored with the Weatherhead East Asian Institute (WEAI) and the Center for Korean Research, and made possible with the support of LG Electronics, Inc. 
 
General Leon J. LaPorte, Commander of the United States and United Nations Forces in Korea, gave an insightful presentation on the challenges of leading the U.S. and UN forces in Korea. He faces political pressure from South Korean student groups to reduce forces or leave the area, yet maintains support among South Korean leaders who value the defense against North Korea. Gen. LaPorte described the military's plan to move out of the center of Seoul, which he believes will help improve relations with South Korean residents. 
 

The IMF, the US, and Financial Crises in Emerging Economies

Thursday,  24 March 2005
Part of the World Bank Lecture Series co-sponsored with the Program in International Economic Policy. 
 
Brad Setser, Research Associate, Global Economic Governance Programme, University College, Oxford, explored different types of financial crises in developing economies and options for dealing with them, including bailouts and “bail-ins” (i.e. support programs).
 

Caged Tiger on the Korean Peninsula

Thursday,  10 March 2005
Co-sponsored with the Korean Economic Institute (KEI), Center for Korean Research (CKR), and the Weatherhead East Asian Institute (WEAI).  
 
This symposium featured two panels; the first focused on North Korea’s nuclear program, and the second looked at the impact of the nuclear program on North Korea’s political economy.
 

Rebuilding the Trust Between America and the World 

Tuesday,  1 March 2005
Part of the Weatherhead Policy Forum co-sponsored with the Weatherhead East Asian Institute.  
 
Kishore Mahbubani,  Dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, Singapore and former Ambassador of the Republic of Singapore to the United Nations, provided a stimulating talk exploring the evolving historical role of the United States in the world.  The Ambassador  posited that the U.S. must take concrete actions to counter negative perceptions abroad in a shrinking and increasingly interdependent world.  A conference report is available.
 

Korea’s Financial Evolution: A Banker’s Perspective

Monday,  28 February 2005
The Program on Alternative Investments (PAI) of CJEB was a co-sponsor of the event, along with the Korean Business Association and Asian Business Association.
 
Robert Fallon, Chairman of Korean Exchange Bank (KEB) made his first public appearance since taking over as CEO and Chairman of KEB (although he had resigned as CEO in January 2005 while maintaining his position as Chairman).  Mr. Fallon gave a fascinating account of his tenure at KEB as the first foreigner to chair a publicly traded corporation in the history of South Korea; despite much institutional and cultural inertia, he managed to transform KEB’s balance sheet from a loss of $209 million in 2003 to a profit of $509 million in 2004 through a vigorous restructuring process. 
 

Inside the World Bank: A Discussion with Carole Brookins

Friday,  18 February 2005
This event was held as part of the World Bank Lecture Series co-sponsored with the Program in International Economic Policy.  
 
Ms. Brookins, former U.S. Executive Director of the World Bank, described her experience at the Bank. She described in detail the workings of the Executive Board.
 

Japan, APEC and East Asian Economic Cooperation

Monday,  14 February 2005
This is the annual Mitsui USA Symposium, co-sponsored with the Center on Japanese Economy and Business and the Mitsui USA Foundation.  
 
Five speakers addressed the complex economic interrelationships among countries in East Asia as well as with the European Union, the United States and other areas of the world, focusing particularly on APEC, the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the numerous regional free trade agreements (FTAs) developed over the past few years.
 

Inside the World Bank: A Discussion with Ko-Yung Tung

Friday,  28 January 2005
Part of the World Bank Lecture Series co-sponsored with the Program in International Economic Policy. 
 
Mr. Tung, Former General Counsel and Vice President of the World Bank, gave an extensive presentation about his experience with the World Bank and the decision-making processes involved, particularly with the awarding of loans for large projects.  He focused on certain large scale projects in China, showing a film describing the reasons for the WB loan approval, as well as a reversal of this approval after intense pressure from Tibetan rights and environmental groups.  He described  this outcome as tragically ironic; since the Chinese government was determined to carry out the project anyway, it would now be exempt from the myriad environmental, cultural and other good governance regulations adhered to by the World Bank.
 

The World Bank and Its Enemies:

How the Left and the Right Conspire to Undermine Development

Thursday,  27 January 2005
Part of a World Bank Lecture Series co-sponsored with the Program in International Economic Policy.  
 
In 2003, Sebastian Mallaby, columnist for the Washington Post, spent many hours with World Bank President James Wolfensohn writing The World’s Banker, a history of the institution under Mr. Wolfensohn.  Mr. Mallaby described how political elements on both the left and the right undermine the agenda of global economic development through trade; the left by attacking the framework as incompatible with labor and environmental laws, and the right by decrying the lack of national autonomy.

Contact Us

APEC Study Center at Columbia University
Columbia University, 3022 Broadway
2M-9 Uris Hall
New York, NY 10027-7004
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Events

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The ‘History Problem’

April 23, 2014

My Fight for a New Taiwan: One Woman's Journey from Prison to Power

April 25, 2014

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