Chazen Senior Scholars

The Chazen Institute draws on the expertise of world-class faculty members to help shape the thinking and discourse on major global business issues.


Andrew Ang 
Ann F. Kaplan Professor of Business
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Empirical asset pricing
Professor Ang specializes in empirical asset pricing and applications of econometrics to financial problems. He has developed macro-models of fixed income, valuation models with time-varying expected returns, models of downside risk and other non-linearities in asset returns, and models of dynamic asset allocation.


Geert Bekaert 
Leon G. Cooperman Professor of Finance and Economics
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: International asset pricing
Professor Bekaert’s research focus is international finance, with a particular interest in foreign exchange market efficiency, exchange rate determination and international and emerging equity markets.


Patrick Bolton 
Barbara and David Zalaznick Professor of Business
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Corporate finance and international financial architecture
Professors Bolton’s research is in contract theory and contracting issues in corporate finance and industrial organization. A central focus of his work is on the allocation of control and decision rights to contracting parties when long-term contracts are incomplete. He also recently organized an inaugural international conference on sovereign wealth funds.


Bradford

Anu Bradford 
Henry L. Moses Professor of Law and International Organization
Director, The European Legal Studies Center
Columbia Law School

Areas of expertise: International trade law and international political economy, International antitrust law, international relations theory, European Union law
After completing her LL.M. studies as a Fulbright Scholar at Harvard Law School, Bradford practiced antitrust law and European Union law at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton in Brussels for two years before returning to Harvard for her doctoral studies. She has also served as an adviser on economic policy in the Parliament of Finland and as an expert assistant to a member of the European Parliament.


Charles W. Calomiris
Henry Kaufman Professor of Financial Institutions
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: Financial institutions and corporate finance in both emerging and developed markets
Professor Calomiris is one of the country’s leading authorities on financial institutions. His research spans the areas of banking, corporate finance, financial history and monetary economics. He has advised numerous firms, agencies and governments on the performance and regulation of financial institutions.


Guillermo Calvo
Professor of International and Public Affairs
School of International Public Affairs, Columbia University

Area of expertise: Emerging markets
Professor Calvo's main field of expertise is macroeconomics of emerging market and transition economies. His recent work has dealt extensively with capital flows and balance-of-payments crises in emerging market economies. He has published several books and more than 100 articles in leading economic journals.


Noel Capon 
R.C. Kopf Professor of International Marketing
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Marketing planning and strategy
Professor Capon’s research interests are in key/strategic account management, and marketing planning and strategy.


Alessandra Casella
Professor of Economics
Columbia University, Department of Economics

Area of Expertise: political economy, public economics, and experimental economics
Casella is a fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge), and the Center for Economic Policy Research (London). Her book "Storable Votes. Protecting the Minority Voice" was published by Oxford University Press in 2012. Casella is Director of the Columbia Laboratory for the Social Sciences.


Fangruo Chen
MUTB Professor of International Business
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Supply chain management
Professor Chen’s research addresses issues in production/distribution planning, procurement auctions, supplier management, supply chain coordination, supply chain information sharing, incentive contracts, salesforce incentives, etc.


Richard Clarida
C. Lowell Harriss Professor of Economics
Columbia University, Department of Economics

Area of expertise: International finance and open-economy macroeconomics
Professor Clarida has previously served as the Assistant Secretary of the United States Treasury for Economic Policy. In that position, he served as chief economic advisor to the Treasury Secretary on a wide range economic policy issues, including the U.S. and global economic prospects, international capital flows, corporate governance, and the maturity structure of U.S. debt. He has also published numerous articles in leading academic journals on monetary policy, exchange rates, interest rates, and international capital flows.


John C. Coffee, Jr.
Adolf A. Berle Professor of Law
Columbia Law School

Area of expertise: Corporate law and securities regulation
Member or former member, Economic Advisory Board to Nasdaq; SEC Advisory Committee on the Capital Formation and Regulatory Processes; the Subcouncil on Capital Markets of the United States Competitiveness Policy Council; the Legal Advisory Board to the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD); Legal Advisory Committee to the board of directors of the New York Stock Exchange.


Donald Davis
Kathryn & Shelby Cullom Davis Professor of Economics & International Affairs
School of International Public Affairs, Columbia University

Areas of expertise: International trade, development economics
Recent research by Professor Davis includes studies of how trade liberalization affects wages and unemployment levels.


William Duggan
Senior Lecturer in Business
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Africa
Professor Duggan spent 20 years in the field of African economic development, primarily with the Ford Foundation. He is co-author with Dean Glenn Hubbard of the book The Aid Trap: Hard Truths About Ending Poverty (2009).


Ronald Findlay
Ragnar Nurkse Professor of Economics
School of International Public Affairs, Columbia University

Area of expertise: International trade
Professor Findlay is a noted authority in international trade, economic development, and political economy, he has written extensively on those topics.


Nelson Fraiman
Professor of Professional Practice
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: Retailing, consulting and process industries
Professor Fraiman joined the faculty after a 17-year career at International Paper Company, where his most recent position was chief technology officer for eight manufacturing divisions. His research explores institutionalizing quality improvement.


Sunil Gulati 
Senior Lecturer, Department of Economics
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: Development economics, international trade
Professor Gulati is the president of the US Soccer Federation. He has been instrumental in developing the world’s biggest game in the United States.


Trevor Harris
Arthur J. Samberg Professor of Professional Practice
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: Valuation, investment and management decisions in accounting
Professor Harris' research and practical experience has covered most areas of the use of accounting information for valuation, investment and management decisions, with a particular focus on global aspects. He has published widely on valuation and accounting issues, in both academic and practitioner journals. He has made presentations at over 200 conferences, institutes and universities around the world.


Jonas Hjort
Assistant Professor, Finance and Economics

Areas of expertise: Firms and labor markets in developing countries
Professor Hjort’s research focuses primarily on the interaction of firms and labor markets in developing countries, as well as on firms’ social impact.


Robert Hodrick
Nomura Professor of International Finance
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: International asset pricing
Professor Hodrick’s current research explores the empirical implications of theoretical pricing models that generate time-varying risk premiums in the markets for bonds, equities and foreign currencies. He is also a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research.


Glenn Hubbard
Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics, and Dean
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: Public finance and macroeconomics
Professor Hubbard is a specialist in public finance, managerial information and incentive problems in corporate finance, and financial markets and institutions. In a recent book, Tax Policy and Multinational Corporations, he argues that US tax policy significantly affects financing and investment decisions of multinational corporations. Hubbard was deputy assistant of the US Treasury Department and a consultant to the Federal Reserve Board, Federal Reserve Bank of New York and many government agencies.


Paul Ingram
Kravis Professor of Business
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: Exchange and trade relationships, networks and institutions
Ingram’s current research projects examine the influence of intergovernmental organizations on bilateral trade and democratization; the structure and efficacy of managers' professional networks in China and the United States; and the effects of networks and institutions on the evolution of the Glasgow shipbuilding industry.


Sheena Iyengar
S. T. Lee Professor of Business
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Consumer choice models
Considered one of the world's experts on choice, Professor Iyengar is author of The Art of Choosing. In the book she explores topics such as why choice is powerful and where its power comes from, the ways in which people make choices, the relationship between how we choose and who we are, why we are so often disappointed by our choices, how much control we really have over our everyday choices, how we choose when our options are practically unlimited, whether we should ever let others choose for us, and if so, whom and why. Her book was a finalist for the Financial Times Business Book of the Year 2010 award and was ranked #3 on the Amazon.com Best Books of 2010: Business & Investing Top 10.


Merit Janow
Dean
School of International Public Affairs, Columbia University

Area of expertise: International trade
While at Columbia, Professor Janow has undertaken a variety of external advisory activities along with her substantial ongoing research activities. In December 2003, she was elected to serve as one of the seven Members of the World Trade Organization’s Appellate Body. During her four years of service she presided over 30 appeals, on matters including high technology, agricultural subsidies, trade remedies, and GATT provisions. Professor Janow has recently become a charter member of the International Advisory Board of the China Investment Corporation, China’s sovereign wealth fund. Professor Janow was also Deputy Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Japan and China (1990-93).


Kamel Jedidi 
John Howard Professor of Business, and Chair, Marketing Division
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: Pricing, product positioning, and market segmentation
Dr. Jedidi has extensively published in leading marketing and statistical journals. He is Senior Editor for the Consumer Needs and Solutions Journal and serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing. He is a Founding Trustee of the Marketing Accountability Standards Board (MASB), a member of the Faculty Steering Committee, Columbia Global Centers (Amman), a Senior Editor for Rutgers Business Review, and a member of the Academic Council of ENPC’s School of International Management.


Wei Jiang
Arthur F. Burns Professor of Free and Competitive Enterprise
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Investment companies and their role in corporate decisions and governance
Professor Jiang's main research interest lies in investment companies (such as mutual funds, closed-end funds, and hedge funds), and institutional investors' role in corporate decisions and governance.


Gita Johar
Meyer Feldberg Professor of Business 
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Consumer psychology
Professor Johar's expertise lies in consumer psychology, focusing on how consumers react to marketing efforts, especially advertising, promotions and sponsorship. She also examines the influence of consumer self-control and perceptions of control on decision making and consumption. This research has implications for the design of effective communication strategies.


Juhasz

Réka Juhász 
Assistant Professor of Economics
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: International trade, economic history, development and growth
Current work includes a natural experiment to estimate the causal effect of temporary trade protection on long-term economic development and research on the impact of information along the supply chain.


Amit Khandelwal
Director of the Chazen Institute for Global Business
Jerome A. Chazen Professor of Global Business
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: International trade and Indian economy
Professor Khandelwal's research examines issues in international and development economics, including the strategic response of firms to trade liberalizations and increased international competition.


Bruce Kogut 
Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Professor of Leadership and Ethics
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Corporate governance, corporate social resonsibility, ethics, India, strategy
Professor Kogut’s current research focuses on governance and corporate compensation, social capital markets and social metrics , and the “political color of boards,” financed by the National Science Foundation in the area of sociology and computational social science. In cooperation with IFMR in Chennai, colleagues and he are researching the contributions of prosocial attitudes of employees and incentives on the productivity of microfinance institutions.


Rajeev Kohli
Ira Leon Rennert Professor of Business
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: Models of consumer preference and choice, new product development
Professor Kohli's research interests are in models of consumer preference and choice, techniques for new product development, Internet technology and personalization, analysis of algorithms, and combinatorial optimization. He has published articles on these subjects in leading journals in marketing, management science, operations research, mathematical psychology, computer science, and discrete mathematics.


Petros Mavroidis 
Edwin B. Parker Professor of Foreign and Comparative Law
Columbia Law School

Area of expertise: World Trade Organization
Professor Mavroidis earned his law degree at the University of Thessaloniki and has an LL.M. from Berkeley. He originally focused his work on antitrust and public international law, but after working in the WTO’s legal division in the 1990s, he has written extensively on the organization and its predecessor, GATT.


Stephan Meier
Associate Professor of Management
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Behavioral strategy
Professor Meier investigates the impact of psychology and economics on human decision-making and its implications for public policy and firms' strategy. Current research topics include how non-selfish behavior affect organizations or the effect of borrower’s decision-making on financial institutions’ strategy.


Michael Morris
Chavkin-Chang Professor of Leadership
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Social judgment and negotiation
Professor Morris is highly regarded for his research on social judgment, the study of how people make sense of events observed in their environment (both internal and external to their work settings). One of his main emphases is on the effects of cross-cultural differences on social judgment.


Emi Nakamura
David W. Zalaznick Associate Professor of Business
Columbia Business School

Area of Expertise: International economics
Professor Nakamura's research focuses on issues in empirical macroeconomics, international economics, and industrial organization.


Arvind Panagariya
Jagdish Bhagwati Professor of Indian Political Economy, International and Public Affairs and Economics
School of International Public Affairs, Columbia University

Areas of expertise: International trade and Indian economy
Professor Panagariya has written or edited ten books. His latest book, India: The Emerging Giant, was published in March 2008 by the Oxford University Press, New York and has been described as the "definitive book on the Indian economy" by Fareed Zakaria and "a tour de horizon and a tour de force" by Jagdish Bhagwati. His previous books include The Economics of Preferential Trade Agreements, 1996, AEI Press (with Jagdish Bhagwati) and Lectures on International Trade, 1998, MIT Press (with J. Bhagwati and T.N. Srinivasan). Panagariya writes a monthly column in the Economic Times, India's top financial daily. He has also written guest columns in the Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, Hindu, India Today and Outlook. He has appeared on numerous national and foreign television channels.


Hugh Patrick
Robert D. Calkins Professor of International Business Emeritus
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Japanese economy
Professor Patrick's major fields of published research on Japan include macroeconomic performance and policy, banking and financial markets, government-business relations, and Japan United States economic relations. His most recent book, coauthored and co-edited with Takatoshi Ito and David E. Weinstein, is Reviving Japan’s Economy: Problems and Prescriptions (MIT Press, 2005).


Stephen Penman
George O. May Professor of Accounting
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: Valuation of equity and security analysis
Professor Penman's research is concerned with the valuation of equity and the role of accounting information in security analysis. His new book, Accounting for Value, was published in 2011.


Andrea Prat 
Richard Paul Richman Professor of Business
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: Organizational economics, political economy, financial economics
Professor Prat’s work in organizational economics investigates, both theoretically and empirically, how attentional allocation patterns affect organizational performance. His work in political economy focuses mainly on the role of communication in politics. And his work in financial economics explores the effect of agency problems on financial markets.


Rajgopal

Shivaram Rajgopal 
Roy Bernard Kester and T.W. Byrnes Professor of Accounting and Auditing
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: Financial reporting, earnings quality, fraud, executive compensation
Professor Rajgopal is an Associate Editor at the Journal of Accounting and Economics and was an editor at Contemporary Accounting Research. He was on the editorial board of The Accounting Review from 2003 to 2011. He is widely published in finance and accounting journals and is frequently cited in the popular press, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Bloomberg, Fortune, Forbes, Financial Times, and The Economist.


Jón Steinsson
Associate Professor of Economics
Columbia University, Department of Economics

Area of Expertise: International economics


sundaresan

Suresh Sundaresan 
Chase Manhattan Bank Foundation Professor of Financial Institutions
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Treasury auctions, bidding, default risk, habit formation, term structure of interest rates, asset pricing, investment theory, pension asset allocation, swaps, options, forwards, futures, fixed-income securities markets and risk management
Professor  Sundaresan's current research work focuses on corporate bankruptcy, design of bankruptcy code, the role of collateral in interest rate swaps, and the role of central bank in providing liquidity to private capital markets. More recently, he has been working on micro-lending with a view to characterizing defaults, recovery rates, and interest rates in micro-loans. The research attempts to characterize the efforts that are needed to lower the borrowing rates. Another ongoing project explores whether the duration of the borrowing relationship has led to an improvement of borrower's welfare.


Jan Svejnar
James T. Shotwell Professor of Global Political Economy
Columbia University, School of International and Public Affairs

Areas of expertise: effects of government policies on firms, labor and capital markets; corporate, national, and global governance and performance; and entrepreneurship
Professor Svejnar previously served as director of the International Policy Center at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan. He is a founder and Chairman of CERGE-EI in Prague (an American-style Ph.D. program in economics that educates economists for Central-East Europe and the Newly Independent States). He serves as the Chairman of the Supervisory Board of CSOB Bank and co-editor of Economics of Transition. He is a Fellow of the European Economic Association and Research Fellow of the Center for Economic Policy Research (London) and Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA, Bonn).


Eric Verhoogen
Associate Professor of Economics
Columbia University, Department of Economics

Area of expertise: International trade and development
Professor Verhoogen's main research interest is applied microeconomic research on firms in developing countries. This area overlaps with the fields of development economics, international trade, labor economics, and industrial organization. A recurrent theme in his work is the process of quality upgrading in the manufacturing sectors of developing countries — its causes, consequences, and broader implications.


Jonathan Vogel
Associate Professor of Economics
Columbia University, Department of Economics

Area of Expertise: Industrial Organization, International Trade


Wang

Dan J. Wang 
Assistant Professor of Business
Columbia Business School

Area of expertise: Social networks
Dan Wang’s research analyzes how social networks facilitate the transfer and transformation of knowledge across organizational and cultural boundaries. His main work focuses on “reverse brain drain,” or how the return migration of skilled professionals catalyzes the flow of knowledge and practices to their home countries. 


Shang-Jin Wei
N.T. Wang Professor of Chinese Business and Economy
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: International finance, trade and Chinese economy
In addition to his teaching duties, Professor Wei is director of the Jerome A. Chazen Institute of International Business, Director for the National Bureau of Economic Research's Working Group on the Chinese Economy and a Research Fellow at the Center for Economic Policy Research (Europe). Before joining Columbia University, he held positions as Assistant Director, Chief of Trade and Investment Division, Chief of Mission to Myanmar (Burma) at the International Monetary Fund, the New Century Chair Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and Associate Professor at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Professor Wei has published extensively on topics on international finance, trade, and the Chinese economy in leading academic journals. His research has also been reported in Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, Economist, Business Week, Chicago Tribune, and other news media.


David Weinstein
Carl Sumner Shoup Professor of Japanese Economics
Columbia University, Department of Economics

Areas of expertise: International trade and Japanese economy
Previously, Professor Weinstein was a Senior Economist and a consultant at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. He also served on the Council of Economic Advisors from 1989 to 1990. His teaching and research interests include international economics, macroeconomics, corporate finance, the Japanese economy, and industrial policy.


Pierre Yared
Ronald H. Cushman Associate Professor of Economics
Columbia Business School

Areas of expertise: Operations/management science and applied economics
Professor Yared's research examines a wide range of issues in macroeconomics and political economy. One branch of research explores the effect of political institutions on economic phenomena such as growth, trade, and public spending and debt. A second branch of research explores the impact of macroeconomic forces on political phenomena such as democratic transitions, coups, and violent conflict.