Fall 2012 MBA Course

B9002-001: Cross Cultural Seminar (Summer)

Instructor: Aaron Wallen

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B9002 Cross-Cultural Seminar offers students an opportunity to explore cross-cultural issues while studying or working in a country other than their country of citizenship for a minimum of six weeks.  Students who have completed at least two semesters at the School are eligible to take this 1.5 credit course.  Students are required to gain approval for the academic credit prior to registration for the course.  To do this, they must bring a completed Cross-Cultural Seminar application form (available in 105 Uris) to the Office of Student Affairs, in which they briefly describe the nature of their proposed cross-cultural experience.  If it is work-related, students must provide a letter from the employer confirming the start and end dates of their internship.

There are two mandatory class meetings: a kick-off session prior to the start of students’ cross-cultural experiences, and a debrief session after their conclusion. Please refer to the syllabus for details.  Students will be graded on the regular A-F scale.  During the six-week experience, students will be required to submit six weekly journals reflecting topics addressed in the first class meeting.  At the conclusion of the course, students will submit a report, 5-6 pages in length, on an approved topic.

Students may only take B9002 twice during the MBA program, for a total of 3 credits.  Note: students may only count a total of 6 credits of B9002 Cross-Cultural Seminar, B8000 Independent Study, and cross-registration courses toward the MBA degree. 

Under current regulations, international students holding F-1 visas who enroll in the Cross-Cultural Seminar course can be authorized for Curricular Practical Training (CPT) provided they meet eligibility and procedural requirements.


Aaron Wallen

LecturerNegotiation and conflict resolution
Gender stereotyping
Age/generational stereotyping
Quantitative methods
Professor Wallen has studied the effects of power asymmetries in conflict situations and is currently investigating the antecedents and effects of vengeance and retribution in such situations. His work in the area of gender stereotyping has focused on the consequences of prescriptive stereotype violation on men and women. He has...

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