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Spring 2007 MBA Course

B8699-027: Direct Marketing

R - B Term, 02:15PM to 05:30PM
Location: URI 333

Over the last several years, many organizations have realized that substantial financial value and competitive advantage can be created by effectively building and managing customer relationships over time, rather than focusing purely on building and managing products. This “customer centric” mindset is associated with a range of new business strategies, metrics, and organizational requirements. 
 
This course will introduce students to the strategies, best practices and metrics associated with “customer centricity”.  Among the issues we will study are:
·     How to segment customers based on profitability and tailor your products and services to these segments
·     Customer-centric business metrics, such as share-of-wallet, churn, silent migration, and cost-per-acquisition, and their uses and misuses
·     The powerful opportunities offered by new media, such as blogs and social networking, for generating more value from customer relationships
·     How you can design effective loyalty programs that will measurably improve customer retention
·     Why most customer satisfaction initiatives fail to deliver results, and how to rightly implement this discipline to drive business improvements and financial value
 
The topics covered in the course are applicable across a wide range of industries: both products and services, both consumer and business markets, and both data-rich and data-poor environments.  This half-semester course consists of a mix of lectures, cases and guest speakers.



Fall 2005 EMBA Course

B7399-267: PRIVATE EQUITY



Summer 2005 EMBA Course

B7399-067: PRIVATE EQUITY



Spring 2005 EMBA Course

B7399-067: PRIVATE EQUITY



Fall 2007 PHD Course

B9824-001: (PhD) Foundations of Optimization

W Full Term - 02:15PM to 05:15PM
Location: URI 328

Mathematical optimization provides a unifying framework for studying issues of rational decision-making, optimal design, effective resource allocation and economic efficiency. It is therefore a central methodology of many business-related disciplines, including operations research, marketing, accounting, economics, game theory and finance. In many of these
disciplines, a solid background in optimization theory is essential for doing research.

This course provides a rigorous introduction to the fundamental theory of optimization. It examines optimization theory in deterministic settings, including optimization in Rn and as well as in more general vector spaces. The course emphasizes the unifying themes (optimality conditions, Lagrange multipliers, convexity, duality) that are common to all these areas of mathematical optimization. Applications across a range of problem areas also play a key role in the class. The goal of the course is to provide students with a foundation sufficient to use basic optimization in their own research work and/or to pursue more specialized studies involving optimization theory.

The course is open to all students, but it is designed for entering doctoral students. The prerequisites are calculus, linear algebra and some familiarity with real analysis. Other concepts (e.g., vector spaces) are developed as needed throughout the course.



Fall 2006 MBA Course

B9601-063: Strategy Consulting Skills

MW - Full Term, 10:45AM to 12:15PM

This course exposes students to the structured problem-solving and communication skills used in management consulting. The course is organized around the five phases of a typical marketing or strategy engagement: scope definition, problem structuring, data gathering and analysis, recommendations development and final presentation. Students get to learn and practice specific consulting tools and principles associated with each of these five phases, such as issue trees, hypothesis-driven problem solving, interview guides, triangulation, pyramid structure and storylines. The course emphasizes hands-on practice and real-time feedback. Formal discussion of consulting tools and skills is supplemented by mini–case exercises and consulting cases based on real-life engagements. Working in teams, students get opportunities to practice and hone the skills they are introduced to during the course through in-class presentations and feedback. These skills covered in the course are broadly applicable across business functions and industries, and besides their relevance to management consulting will be valuable to entrepreneurs and managers in the strategy, business-development or marketing-planning aspects of their work.



Fall 2006 MBA Course

B9601-062: Strategy Consulting Skills

MW - Full Term, 12:30PM to 02:00PM

This course exposes students to the structured problem-solving and communication skills used in management consulting. The course is organized around the five phases of a typical marketing or strategy engagement: scope definition, problem structuring, data gathering and analysis, recommendations development and final presentation. Students get to learn and practice specific consulting tools and principles associated with each of these five phases, such as issue trees, hypothesis-driven problem solving, interview guides, triangulation, pyramid structure and storylines. The course emphasizes hands-on practice and real-time feedback. Formal discussion of consulting tools and skills is supplemented by mini–case exercises and consulting cases based on real-life engagements. Working in teams, students get opportunities to practice and hone the skills they are introduced to during the course through in-class presentations and feedback. These skills covered in the course are broadly applicable across business functions and industries, and besides their relevance to management consulting will be valuable to entrepreneurs and managers in the strategy, business-development or marketing-planning aspects of their work.


Fall 2014 EMBA Course

B7355-001: Impact Investing Seminar

EMBA Weeknight Format: Wednesdays , 1.5 credit course meeting Wed evenings (Oct 29; Nov 5, 12, 19; Dec 3, 10)

This course provides a detailed introduction to the emerging sector of impact investing, equipping students with vital, practitioner-focused skills in the following areas: 1) equity, debt and alternative investment structuring for early- through late-stage social ventures; 2) assessment of impact and financial value for companies and investment portfolios; 3) legal and governance strategies to preserve mission-focus throughout organizational scale; and 4) role of investment funds and philanthropy in building the impact investing marketplace. The course content is split into three modules, covering the key finance techniques, funds and infrastructure and market-level issues and opportunities. Sessions are almost exclusively case-based and students will be required to prepare multiple investment proposals for the case studies used. Overall, the course aims to communicate the complex dynamics between investors and social ventures in valuation and structuring, the challenges around defining and measuring social impact and finally the inevitable conflict between financial and social return that occurs regardless of business model. Impact investing is a rapidly evolving sector and up-to-date publications and articles will be provided throughout.


Fall 2014 EMBA Course

B7557-001: Social Entrepreneurship for the 21st Century

EMBA Weeknight Format: Wednesdays , 1.5 credit course meeting Wed evenings (Sep 10, 17, 24; Oct 8, 15, 22)

In less than a generation, we have witnessed a tectonic shift in the way people think about and work toward social change. The groundswell of new activism — social entrepreneurship — is manifest across society as innovative change makers test new solutions to entrenched social, economic, and environmental problems. This course is designed for students who are interested in understanding and participating in social entrepreneurship, whether they pursue careers (or avocations) in the nonprofit, private or public sectors. The course gives an overview of the field, with in depth examples and case studies of innovative change makers and organizations in the nonprofit, private and public sectors that illuminate the traits and tools of the new activism: a heightened emphasis on measurement and evaluation; an embrace of competition in a number of forms, including the design and implementation of market based instruments like prizes and challenges; the development of ‘laboratories’ to foster social innovations which can then be brought to scale; experiments with technology and the use of open and crowd source solutions to social change; and a new thinking about asset management and investment, the nature of social value and returns, and the sources of capital available to address chronic social problems. The course also explores the opportunities and tensions inherent in cross-sector work: the definition of public goods, and the respective roles that philanthropy, government and commercial actors play in providing them. Classes will combine lectures, class discussions, and presentations by some of today’s most innovative social entrepreneurs.

The course is divided into three sections:

1. Social Entrepreneurship in the Nonprofit Sector examines the emergence of a new kind of service provider, a new breed of funder – the so-called venture philanthropy – and the business models each employ to advance social change;

2. Social Impact in the Private Sector explores the infusion of social sector values into profit-making activities from the enterprise and investor perspectives, including the emerging field of impact investing and the growing number of firms that seek to create societal or environmental benefit – “shared” or “blended” value – through commercial business; and

3. Social Innovation in the Public Sector includes case studies of entrepreneurship within government, and the use of various policy tools to identify and scale proven solutions to entrenched problems, foster innovation, and enlist the energy and resources of private (nonprofit and commercial) actors to common purpose.





Summer 2006 EMBA Course

B7713-001: INTRODUCTION TO VENTURING

- 04:00AM to 05:00AM

This course provides an overview of the entrepreneurial process. The focus is on identifying and evaluating ideas and learning the steps and competencies required to launch a successful new venture. Students are challenged to consider the appropriateness of an entrepreneurial career for themselves. Specific topics include characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, techniques for finding and screening ideas, entrepreneurial finance, the politics of new ventures, valuation and deal making, writing a business plan, buying a business, family business dynamics, and managing crisis and failure.



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