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What do I do ?

In order to adhere to the notions of truth, integrity, and respect that we as community members swore to uphold, it is your responsibility to not only avoid violating the honor code yourself, but also address suspected violations committed by your peers.

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On this page, you will find some links to some very informative resources on Academic Conduct, Group Work Guidelines, and CBS Disciplinary Procedures.

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Representing the School

The Honor Board is made up by the Honor Representatives elected by each cluster. The board is called on to serve as a component of the disciplinary hearing team when an honor infraction occurs.

Meet the Board>

Answering Your Questions

Columbia Business School launched a new Honor Code in Spring 2007. Following are answers to frequently asked questions about the new Code, the meaning behind its language, and how it was developed.

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The Honor Code of Columbia Business School

As a lifelong member of the Columbia Business School community, I adhere to the principles of truth, integrity and respect. I will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do.

The Columbia Business School Honor Code calls on all members of the School community to adhere to and uphold the notions of truth, integrity, and respect both during their time in school, and throughout their careers as productive, moral, and caring participants in their companies and communities around the world.

Resources

• Honor Code, Academic Conduct and Other Policies

• Penalty Guidelines for Breaches of Academic Integrity and Conduct

• Individual and Group Work Guidelines Table CBS Disciplinary Procedures

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Alumni Voices

"No matter what the competitive landscape, as real leaders, we must do the tough thing, the right thing."
-Sallie Krawcheck, MBA '92

 

The Curl Ideas to wrap your mind around

Columbia Business School Ushers in Centennial Milestone with the Launch of a Multi-Year Celebration

Columbia Business School today announced the launch of its centennial celebration, unveiling a new website and announcing an array of events to commemorate the School’s landmark achievements over the past 100 years.

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All in the Family

People often talk about the close bonds that define the School’s community, but the Guenthers take the idea of a “Columbia Business School family” to a new level.

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2015 Deming Cup to Be Awarded to Kenneth Chenault and Toby Cosgrove

The W. Edwards Deming Center at Columbia Business School announced that the 2015 Deming Cup for Operational Excellence will be awarded to Kenneth I. Chenault, chairman and CEO of American Express, and Dr. Delos M. “Toby” Cosgrove, president and CEO of Cleveland Clinic.

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3 Big, Bold Career Moves

Top ways to audaciously position yourself for your next job and beyond

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Columbia Business School Partners with the White House to Expand Opportunities for Female Leaders

Columbia Business School has long been a leader in identifying building a pipeline that encourages and supports female leaders.

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Want to Field a Winning Team? Try Equality

Research from Professor Adam Galinsky studied FIFA data from 199 soccer teams and found that the more broadly-based your talent search, the more people you will encounter and the higher the probability that you will find talent in places you never knew existed.

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Lorraine Marchand Named Director of Healthcare and Pharmaceutical Management Program

In her new role, which she assumes on August 3, Marchand will be responsible for strategic, curricular, and administrative initiatives for the program, working closely with students, faculty and staff members, alumni, and corporate sponsors.

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You’re More Creative When You’re Sarcastic, Study Says

Research by Professor Adam Galinsky reveals that people who express and receive sarcastic comments are more creative.

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Stop Thinking about Markets as If They Were Human

The language we use to describe market moves affects our behavior, says Professor Michael Morris’ research. Therefore, how TV commentators speak about markets can influence investors' opinions.

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