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Penalty Guidelines

Breaches of Academic Integrity and Conduct include:

Plagiarism: to steal or pass off the ideas or words of another as one’s own; to use without crediting the source.
Cheating: to violate rules intentionally (such as examination rules) to effect a fraud or deceit.
Disruptive conduct: conduct or actions that disrupt or interfere with the normal academic process or learning experience.

Infraction Examples2 Sentence
Plagiarism or cheating on a formal examination or other culminating experience. Plagiarism – submitting the work or ideas of another as one’s own; passing off the words or ideas of another as one’s own; use of Internet sources without proper citation or credit to the source; self-plagiarism.

Cheating – request or receive unauthorized help; use of crib notes or other impermissible aids during exams; inappropriate use of technology during an exam, such as opening prohibited computer files, use of cell phones, BlackBerrys (or other communication devices), checking, reading or sending email during any exam; passing on exam materials that are marked as ‘not to be shared’ to other students; peeking into other students’ work (orallowing others to do so); aiding and abetting others who cheat.
Range from F in the class to suspension or expulsion from the School.

Repeat offenses escalate the penalty for an infraction.
Plagiarism or cheating on course assignments (e.g.,homework, case submission) Plagiarism – submitting the work or ideas of another as one’s own; passing off the words or ideas of another as one’s own; use of Internet sources without proper citation or credit to the source; self-plagiarism; turning in another student’s work as one’s own.

Cheating - request or receive unauthorized help; passing on homework materials that are marked as ‘not to be shared’ to other students; working as a group on assignments designated as “individual” assignments (type C); adding the name of a student to a group project when that student did not contribute significantly to the group’s work.
Range from F in the class to suspension or expulsion from the School.

Repeat offenses escalate the penalty for an infraction.

Significant mitigating factors, such as lack of intent or an inadvertent error, may lower the penalty.
Disruptions to the learning process (where expectations have been clearly set by the faculty or administration) or to the school’s (broadly defined) community. Verbal or physical abuse of faculty, students, administrators, or other community members; inappropriate or disruptive use of technology either during class (such as the unauthorized use of computers or BlackBerrys) or outside of class (such as email spamming); actions or activities that embarrass the School to its outside constituencies; tardiness to class or unexcused absences from class. Range from expulsion from the class and an F grade in the course to loss of student privileges and/or suspension and expulsion from the School.

Repeat offenses escalate the penalty for an infraction.
1. All lists of infringements and infractions are not exhaustive.
2. Examples are not exhaustive. The examples serve merely as guidance for Disciplinary Committee

The Honor Code of Columbia Business School

As a lifelong member of the Columbia Business School community, I adhere to the principles of truth, integrity and respect. I will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do.

The Columbia Business School Honor Code calls on all members of the School community to adhere to and uphold the notions of truth, integrity, and respect both during their time in school, and throughout their careers as productive, moral, and caring participants in their companies and communities around the world.

Resources

• Honor Code, Academic Conduct and Other Policies

• Penalty Guidelines for Breaches of Academic Integrity and Conduct

• Individual and Group Work Guidelines Table CBS Disciplinary Procedures

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