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Bernstein: 2005 Events

2005 Events

Business and the Global HIV/AIDS Pandemic

Wednesday November 30, 2005 at 5:00 – 6:30 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 141
Panelists:
- Samir Khalil, Executive Director of HIV Policy & External Affairs, Europe Middle East & Africa, Merck & Co.
- Trevor Neilson, Executive Director, Global Business Coalition on HIV/AIDS
- Anil Soni, Director of Pharmaceutical Services, Clinton Foundation HIV/AIDS Initiative
- Kim Nichols, Executive Director, African Services Committee
Moderated by Lee Branstetter, Daniel W. Stanton Associate Professor of Business, Columbia Business School.

Supported by: the Africana Association * SIPA Pan-African Network * Managers for International Development Initiatives * Student Leadership & Ethics Board * Institute of African Studies * Global Justice * Health Care Industry Association * GBA/COVAP * Greater China Society * South Asian Business Association * Latin American Business Association.

 

Klion Forum – Leo Hindery Jr.

Tuesday November 29 at 5:00 – 6:30 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 326
 
The KPMG Peat Marwick / Stanley R. Klion Forum presents:
Leo Hindery Jr., Chairman of InterMedia Advisors and Executive-in-Residence at Columbia Business School.

Leo J. Hindery, Jr., has spent his career in leadership positions in the media industry and will discuss values-based leadership and the role of CEOs as leaders within business and society.

Prior to founding the YES Network as the CEO in 2001, Mr. Hindery was the CEO of GlobalCenter Inc., a major internet services company, which was merged into Exodus Communications, Inc. Mr. Hindery became president of Tele-Communications, Inc. (TCI), in 1997, and in 1999 he became CEO of AT&T Broadband, which was formed in 1999 by the merger of TCI into AT&T. Before TCI, Mr. Hindery was managing general partner of InterMedia Partners, which he founded in 1988. Mr. Hindery is the author of It Takes a CEO: It’s Time to Lead with Integrity. Please RSVP online.

 

Successful Leadership – Putting Emotional Intelligence & Ethics to Use

Friday November 18 at 10:30 – 11:30 am
Lerner Hall, Columbia University

An interactive workshop, part of the 24th annual Black Business Students Association conference, with tactical advice on how to launch into successful leadership roles by enhancing your technical and professional skills using the five components of emotional intelligence coupled with high ethical standards. Attendees will leave with an assessment of their own emotional intelligence and practical tools to enhance their leadership styles.

Moderator: Jerome Jewell '81 , Founder & President, Jewell Consulting Group. Jerome advises organizations regarding strategic challenges in management strategy and organizational development. He has worked with clients in numerous sectors, including airlines, banking, manufacturing, government agencies, information technology, telecommunication and non-profits. Prior to starting his consulting practice in 1995, Jerome spent more than 20 years in the corporate arena, where he held a variety of management and leadership positions with global industry leaders including the IBM Corporation, Chase Manhattan Bank and the New York Times. His 12 years at IBM included extensive international accomplishment, having worked in Greece, Switzerland, Mexico, France, Belgium, Hungary and the U.K. His language skills include Spanish and German.

Panelist: Myles Reed, Jr. '95, Vice President, U.S. Consumer Card Servicing Group, American Express. Myles has worked in the credit card industry for the past 8 years with American Express in multiple functional areas including Finance, Strategy and Marketing. Myles joined American Express in 1998 in the Finance function supporting the consumer business. After a year, Myles was promoted to the position of Director of Finance supporting the consumer business. In 2000, Myles was promoted to Vice President of Strategic Planning and Business Development where he worked as special assistant to the Group President for the Consumer & Small Business Services organization. His experience in strategy prepared him to make a transition to the Consumer Marketing function where he has worked for the past 3 years, as the Vice President, Green & Gold Card Product Management and in his current position as Vice President of Marketing, Consumer Usage & Retention. Prior to joining American Express, Myles worked for Hewlett Packard and Quaker Oats in various Finance positions. He began his career as a Tax CPA for Arthur Andersen. Myles holds an MBA in Finance and Marketing from Columbia Business School and a Bachelor of Science in Accounting from the University of Michigan. Myles was the President of the Black Business Student Association while at Columbia.

 

Seminar on Collaborative Leadership – Orpheus Process Demonstration

Thursday November 17 at 1:30 – 3:00 pm
Rennert Hall, Kraft Center, 606 West 115th Street

Moderated by Professor Meyer Feldberg, Senior Advisor Morgan Stanley, Dean Emeritus Columbia Business School.
Paul B. Guenther ’64, Chairman, New York Philharmonic;
Ronnie Bauch, Managing Director and Violinist, Orpheus.

Hosted by Morgan Stanley, a global sponsor of the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. For 30 years this exceptional group of artists has provided a model of harmonious collaboration. Orpheus has no one conductor; its members are its leaders. Each musician brings to the ensemble work not only virtuoso skills with an instrument, but also his or her own personal sense of how to serve the music and the group’s success. The Orpheus Process is a valuable tool for shaping new management strategies for a broad range of corporations, academic institutions and non-governmental organizations. The orchestra’s multi-leader management style and “flat” decision-making process encourage collaboration and teamwork, allowing for shared responsibility and commitment to the positive outcome of the group. Program will feature Beethoven: Symphony No. 1. RSVP via email by Tuesday, November 10th to Michael Marich.

 

IBS session – James B. Stewart

Friday November 4 at 11.30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Warren Hall, Room L 107 (ground floor)

Sponsored by the Student Leadership and Ethics Board of the Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Center
Hear James B. Stewart, best-selling author and chronicler of corporate and Wall Street scandals, discuss corporate governance and business ethics. Stewart is the author of best-selling business and leadership books including: Disney Wars, Den of Thieves, Blind Eye, and Blood Sport. A former Page One editor at The Wall Street Journal, Stewart won a Pulitzer Prize in 1988 for his reporting on the stock market crash and insider trading. He is a regular contributor to SmartMoney and The New Yorker. 

 

Challenges faced by Media in covering White-Collar Crime and impact of Corporate Scandals on American Economy

Wednesday October 26 at 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.
The Warwick Hotel New York, 65 West 54th Street (on Avenue of the Americas)

Presented by the Columbia Business School Alumni Club of New York. Panelists include: Bethany Mclean of Fortune; Chris Byron of New York Post; Charles Gasparino of Newsweek; Nelson Boxer of Alston & Bird; and Liz Claman of CNBC. Moderated by Sanjay Sanghoee, Author of Merger, a financial thriller. Please register online.

Bethany McLean is a senior writer at Fortune. She covers a wide variety of topics, with recent stories ranging from Barry Diller and his controversial company InterActive Corp to the scandal at Fannie Mae. McLean graduated from Williams College in 1992 with a double major in mathematics and English. She began her career in the investment banking division of Goldman Sachs, where she worked from 1992 to 1995, spending two years in the Mergers & Acquisitions Department and one year in Real Estate Principal Investing. In 1995, McLean joined Fortune as a reporter. She and Peter Elkind, who is also a senior writer at Fortune, are the co-authors of the The Smartest Guys in the Room: The Amazing Rise and Scandalous Fall of Enron.

Charles Gasparino joined Newsweek in May, 2004, as Senior Writer for the magazine's business section. Gasparino came to Newsweek from the Wall Street Journal, where he spent nine years covering Wall Street, pension funds, mutual funds and regulatory issues. He consistently broke news on some of the biggest financial scandals of recent times, including the fall of Martha Stewart, Henry Blodget and Jack Grubman. He was also the lead reporter on the first story detailing the enormous pay package awarded to former NYSE chief Dick Grasso and wrote about underhanded practices in the mutual funds industry long before they came under scrutiny. He was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in Beat Reporting for his coverage of the Wall Street research scandals for 2002, and was part of a team of reporters nominated for the Pulitzer for their coverage of the NYSE in 2003. Previously, Gasparino spent three years as a reporter for The Bond Buyer, covering municipal finance with an emphasis on stories involving New York City, State and the Securities and Exchange Commission. He also served for two years as a reporter for Bond World, where he covered the Treasury and corporate bond markets. He began his career as a reporter with The Tampa Tribune, after internships at both Newsday and The Dallas Morning News. Gasparino is the author of a book on Wall Street titled Blood on the Street published by Simon & Schuster in January 2005. He received a B.A. from Pace University before earning his Masters degree in journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Liz Claman is co-anchor of CNBC’s Morning Call, and also anchor of primetime program Cover to Cover. Claman joined CNBC in April 1998, after spending three years as an anchor/reporter for NBC affiliate WHDH-TV, Boston. During that time, she also served as contributing correspondent for the NBC-syndicated daytime show RealLife. Prior to that, Claman was an anchor at WEWS-TV (ABC) in Cleveland, where she won an Emmy Award for Best Morning Anchor for her work on the two-hour morning show Morning Exchange. She also gained recognition for her live coverage of Hurricane Andrew and the historic floods in Des Moines, Iowa. Claman began her on-camera career at the ABC affiliate WSYX-TV in Columbus, Ohio – first as a reporter and then, a weekend anchor. Her first foray into television news was as a news intern, and then a news associate at KCBS-TV, Los Angeles. There, at age 23, she became the youngest person in the history of the station to win a local Emmy for Best Spot News Producer. Claman also won a Los Angeles Golden Mike Award for contributing to the station’s coverage of the 1987 Los Angeles Earthquake. Claman is a Big Sister in the Big Brother/Big Sister program at the Jewish Board of Family and Children's' Services of Manhattan, holds a bachelor’s degree in French language from the University of California at Berkeley, as well as a Certificat Superieur from the Universite’ de Paris, La Sorbonne.

Christopher Byron has been writing about business and finance for over 30 years. His well-known Back of the Envelope column ran in The New York Observer for six years and now runs in The New York Post. He is also a contributing editor and financial columnist for MSNBC and Red Herring, and the host of a syndicated daily radio show, Wall Street Wakeup with Chris Byron. Byron worked as an editor and correspondent for Time, and as assistant managing editor of Forbes. He has written four books and his articles have appeared in Esquire, Playboy, New York, Worth, Men’s Health and Travel Holiday magazines, New York Daily News and Bloomberg Daily News. Byron graduated from Yale College and the Columbia University School of Law.

Nelson Boxer is a partner in the Litigation and Trial Practice and Securities Litigation Groups. He focuses his practice on white-collar criminal defense, SEC-related representations and commercial litigation. He has represented individuals and corporations in a variety of these matters, including alleged securities fraud, tax fraud, banking malfeasance and health care fraud, in federal and state courts and before various regulatory agencies. In 2002, Nelson tried a five-week criminal fraud case in the Southern District of New York, and in 2003 he tried a one-week criminal tax fraud case in the Southern District of New York. He also represents clients in New York Stock Exchange and NASD arbitrations. Nelson has conducted numerous corporate internal investigations. Nelson is a former Assistant United States Attorney (Southern District of New York, in Manhattan). As a federal prosecutor, he investigated, prosecuted and tried a variety of cases, including fraud, securities, tax, RICO, Customs, labor and public corruption violations. He also wrote numerous briefs and argued numerous appeals in the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. In September 1997, he received the U.S. Department of Justice, Executive Office of U.S. Attorneys, Director's Award for his successful investigation and prosecution of the ruling hierarchy of the Genovese Organized Crime Family (including its control of the annual Feast of San Gennaro in Little Italy). In October 1994, he received a Special Tribute in the U.S. Department of Justice Inspector General's Report to Congress for his prosecution of corrupt prison guards in Westchester County. Nelson has lectured on the applicability of the attorney-client privilege in internal corporate investigations, and is the author of Using Cookies in Litigation, which appeared in the New York Law Journal and in The Corporate Counsellor in April 1999. Mr. Boxer is a member of the Committee on Criminal Advocacy of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, and also has served as a director of Libraries for the Future, a national nonprofit corporation dedicated to expanding support for, access to, and modernization of public libraries. Nelson is a graduate of the University of Michigan (B.A., magna cum laude, 1984), where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and of New York University School of Law (J.D., 1987). He served as a law clerk for the Honorable Arthur D. Spatt of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York.

Sanjay Sanghoee is the author of Merger, a 380-page high-stakes financial thriller set in the world of media conglomerates, investment banks, and Capitol Hill. He is currently working on his second novel, an international thriller about art theft and terrorism. He has also completed spec episodes for Law & Order and Without a Trace and is developing a new TV drama “The Commission”. Sanjay has an MBA from Columbia Business School and was an investment banker with Lazard Freres & Co. LLC. At Lazard, he worked as part of an 8-person team headed by Steven Rattner; and had the opportunity of working on banking transactions for major media companies such as America Online, Comcast and Time Warner. Most recently, he worked with Dresdner Kleinwort Wasserstein and has a strong foundation in media finance. Sanjay also worked from 1992-1995 with Strategic Intelligence Network, Inc., a spinoff from Kroll Associates. During his time with SINI, he was involved in all facets of corporate investigative work, including liaising with ex-law enforcement officers to conduct due diligence on business transactions. Sanjay is also the Chairman of the Media & Entertainment Committee of Columbia Business School’s Alumni Club.

 

Montrone Seminar – Miguel Schloss

Friday October 14 at 5:00 – 6:30 p.m.
Uris Hall, Calder Lounge

The Paul M. Montrone Seminar Series on Ethics: Miguel Schloss ’68 will discuss governance and anti-corruption issues in emerging markets. Schloss is the Managing Partner of DAMConsult, which has offices in Washington D.C. and Santiago, Chile. DAMConsult is a boutique consulting firm focused on emerging markets and facilitating cross-border business development, by securing financing for its clients from Multilateral Development Banks and export Financing Agencies.

Schloss was previously the Executive Director of Transparency International (Berlin, Germany), responsible to the Chairman and Board for Latin America, Africa, and Middle East, including expansion of operations by 36 local offices and 16 contact representatives, and overall financial management of the organization. Prior to this he worked at the World Bank Group in various positions including: Division Chief of Corporate & Budget Planning; Division Chief of Industry & Energy (Africa); and Telecommunications & Mining (world wide). He has published over 20 articles in major international journals and contributions to books dealing with issues of governance, strategies, budgets, planning financial and banking restructuring, energy policies, industrial development, telecommunications, and economic and development policies.

 

IBS session – Unscripted. Unrehearsed. Real Life. Real Issues.

Tuesday October 11 at 5:00 – 6:30 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 301

Led by Professor Mike Feiner.
Sponsored by the Student Leadership and Ethics Board of the Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Center

What Would You Do...................?
“If your boss and your boss’ boss were to direct you to fire an organizational veteran of 18 years, a scant two months before he was set to retire, thereby preventing his benefits from maturing?”
OR
“If you were charged with reviewing and making a recommendation on a potentially attractive investment for your private equity fund employer, but you believed that the target – a sub-prime auto lender that targeted low income immigrants, often repossessing and “turning” the inventory multiple times – was unsavory or even ethically questionable?”

Many of you have and most of you will face dilemmas like these during your careers. To find out how best to grapple with these kinds of tough ethical issues, please join Professor Michael Feiner and members of the Class of 2007 for an interactive discussion based on the real-life experiences of your classmates.

 

2005 Botwinick Prize in Ethics – Joan Bavaria

Friday October 7 at 1:30  – 2:45 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 301

The recipient of the 2005 Botwinick Prize, Joan Bavaria, Founding President and CEO of Trillium Asset Management, is the keynote speaker for the 2005 Social Enterprise Conference. In 1982 Ms. Bavaria founded Trillium Asset Management, an employee-owned investment advisor for clients concerned with the social and environmental impacts of their investments. Trillium currently manages approximately $900 million. Ms. Bavaria also cofounded the Social Investment Forum and was the founding chair of CERES. Please RSVP to Jennifer Schmidt by September 30, 2005.

 

Individual Leadership and Personal Integrity: The Jonah Creigton Case

Friday August 26 in Uris Hall
Case discussion led by Professor Mike Feiner.

This IBS session is supported by the Citigroup Foundation.
We’ve all read in the past few years about ethical lapses at Enron, WorldCom, Tyco, Parmalat, HealthSouth, Ahold, Skandia and AIG, to name just a few organizations where leaders have slid down a slippery slope. One lesson we can take from these examples is that acting on our values in the workplace requires skill as well as conviction, insight as well as courage, regardless of what level we are within the organization. The case deals with hiring practices, personal standards and convictions, organizational behavior and relationships with superiors and others within the organization, when one is not the CEO. This session challenges you to discover effective ways of dealing with moral dilemmas in the workplace, and explores questions including: How do you interact with others when you feel your personal values challenged? What issues arise in situations that deal with sensitive, ethical issues? How important is personal strategy and style to dealing with values-based situations?

 

Corporate Social Responsibility and the Bottom Line

Tuesday August 23 at 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Lerner Hall Auditorium at Columbia University.

This IBS session is supported by the Citigroup Foundation.
Introduction by R. Glenn Hubbard, Dean of Columbia Business School and Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics. Distinguished speakers: Alan Hassenfeld, Chairman of Hasbro, Inc.; James McDonald, President and CEO of Rockefeller & Co., Inc.; Lord Ronald Oxburgh, Chairman of Shell Transport and Trading Company, p.l.c. (Shell UK). Moderated by Geoffrey Heal, Paul Garrett Professor of Public Policy and Business Responsibility.

This panel explores the relationship between business and society and highlights how companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders. Topics include: Is acting in a socially responsible manner contrary to profits and the bottom line? What is the relationship between stakeholders and shareholder value? What are the social and environmental impacts of a company that business leaders are dealing with? What leadership issues arise in business conduct in emerging markets? What are the expectations that society has of business and business leaders and does this differ across national borders?

Alan Hassenfeld is Chairman of the Board of Hasbro, Inc., a worldwide leader in children's and family leisure time entertainment with $2.9 billion in revenues and an impressive blue-chip portfolio of familiar and popular brand names such as Playskool, Tonka, Milton Bradley and Parker Brothers. Hassenfeld began his career at Hasbro in 1970. He was appointed Vice President of Marketing and Sales in 1978, became the President of the company in 1984, and received the titles of Chairman and CEO in 1989. In May 2003, he passed on the responsibilities of CEO in order to fully concentrate on his position as Chairman. Hassenfeld sits on the board of the salesforce.com/foundation as well as Hasbro's two philanthropic divisions, the Hasbro Charitable Trust and the Hasbro Children's Foundation. He is the former Chairman of the Right Now! Coalition and Admiral of Rhode Island Commodores (a governor-appointed business advisory group). Hassenfeld is the recipient of the Honorary Doctor of Humanities Award from Bryant College and the Honorary Doctor of Business degree from Roger Williams University and Johnson and Wales University.

James S. McDonald, President and CEO of Rockefeller & Co., is also a member of the Board of Directors of Rockefeller & Co. and Rockefeller Financial Services. In addition, Jim is a Director and Chair of the Audit Committee of the New York Stock Exchange, Chairman of the Board and Investment Committee of the Japan Society, New York, Trustee and Chair of the Audit Committee of the Nightingale-Bamford School, New York, NY, Trustee Emeritus of the Fessenden School, Newton, Massachusetts (President, 1993-1999), and a member of the Investment Committees of The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, D.C., the Nightingale-Bamford School, New York, N.Y. Jim and his wife Karen have three children, and live in Manhattan. He is a graduate of Harvard College and the University of Virginia Law School.

Lord Ronald Oxburgh, Chairman of Shell Transport and Trading Company, p.l.c. (Shell UK), is also a member of the House of Lords, United Kingdom. He is a graduate of the Universities of Oxford and Princeton, and taught geology and geophysics at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. In Cambridge he was head of the Department of Earth Sciences and President of Queens’ College. He has been a visiting professor at Stanford University, the California Institute of Technology and Cornell University. From 1988 to 1993, Lord Oxburgh was chief scientific adviser to the Ministry of Defense, and rector of Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine. He has also worked as a consultant to the petroleum industry and to the European Commission on Geothermal energy. Lord Oxburgh has been a member of the Science and the Engineering Research Council, the Natural Environment Research Council, and the Advisory Council for Science and Technology. He was chairman of the UK Inter-Agency Committee on the Environment and Global Change, and a member of the National Academies Policy Advisory Group working party on the future of the national research base. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and a Foreign of the U.S. Academy of Sciences.

 

Corporate Governance: Hollinger International Inc. Case

Tuesday August 23 at 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Shapiro Hall at Columbia University.

Professor Frank Edwards leads a student discussion on the types of transactions, ownership structure, role of the board of directors and key governance mechanisms in this case, and how similar issues have played a role in recent corporate scandals in the news.

 

Dean’s Panel: CEO Perspective on Leadership and Corporate Integrity

Monday August 22 at 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Lerner Hall Auditorium at Columbia University.

This session is followed by a reception from 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. on the Mathematics Lawn.

This IBS session and reception is supported by the Citigroup Foundation.
Introduction by R. Glenn Hubbard, Dean of Columbia Business School and Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics. Distinguished speaker: Chuck Prince, CEO of Citigroup.

This session will explore leadership and corporate governance perspectives in establishing and maintaining corporate ethics and integrity across a global organization. What are the CEO-level personal leadership issues in ensuring ethical decision-making throughout the organization? How does the board and senior executives interact with staff within and outside the U.S. to ensure a high standard of corporate integrity and governance? In a post Sarbanes-Oxley environment and with greater focus on corporate social integrity, how is the relationship between and distribution of rights and responsibilities of auditors, boards, executives, employees, shareholders and other stakeholders changing and does this differ across Citigroup’s international operations? In what ways are executive decision-making, transparency and reporting processes taking into account strategic risks and opportunities from market and non-market factors?

Chuck Prince is the Chief Executive Officer of Citigroup. He serves as a member of the Citigroup Management Committee.

Previously, Mr. Prince was Chairman and CEO of Citigroup's Global Corporate and Investment Banking Group, which provides corporations, governments and institutional investors in more than 100 countries with corporate and investment banking, sales and trading and transaction services.

Mr. Prince began his career as an attorney at U.S. Steel Corporation in 1975 and in 1979 joined Commercial Credit Company (a predecessor company to Citigroup).

Mr. Prince was promoted to Senior Vice President and General Counsel of Commercial Credit Company in 1983, a post he held through its initial public offering in 1986. He assumed additional administrative responsibilities in 1995 and was named Executive Vice President in early 1996. He was made Chief Administrative Officer in early 2000 and Chief Operating Officer in early 2001. He was named Chairman and CEO of the Global Corporate and Investment Bank in 2002. He became CEO of Citigroup in 2003.

Born in 1950, Mr. Prince is a graduate of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. He also holds a Master's Degree in International Relations and a law degree from the University of Southern California as well as a Master of Laws degree from Georgetown University.

Mr. Prince is a member of various bar associations and other professional associations as well as a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is a past member of the Board of Directors of the New York Urban League and is a member of the Board of Directors of Citigroup, the United Negro College Fund and Teachers College, Columbia University.

 

IBS session – Summer screening of Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room

Wednesday July 27 at 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 142

Post-film discussion led by Professor Eric Abrahamson.
“…Writer-director Alex Gibney takes a notorious tale of corporate greed and plays it as Greek tragedy, Texas-style….By focusing his documentary on the people behind the Enron scandal—their foibles, follies and moral frailty—Gibney takes a potentially dry, daunting topic and turns it into something eminently compelling.” – The Associated Press review.
More reviews are available online. Business School students, faculty and staff are welcome.

 

IBS session – Fighting AIDS in Africa: Lessons from Botswana

Wednesday April 13 at 5:00 – 6:30 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 329

The global AIDS crisis has hit Sub-Saharan Africa harder than any other region of the world, and the magnitude of human suffering it has spawned almost defies our imagination:

  • It is estimated that 29.4 million people are currently living with HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa. That is two-thirds of HIV/AIDS cases reported globally.
  • In Zimbabwe and Botswana, one in four adults carries the virus. A child born in Zambia or Zimbabwe today is more likely than not to die of AIDS.
  • There are 13 million children orphaned by AIDS worldwide, 10 million of them in sub-Saharan Africa.

How should the global business community respond this AIDS crisis? In 2000, Merck & Co., Inc., and the Gates Foundation established a pathbreaking partnership with the Government of Botswana to explore comprehensive solutions to the AIDS epidemic in that country. Dr. Jeffrey L. Sturchio, Vice President of Merck & Co., Inc, will discuss the lessons learned through this and other private/public partnerships Merck has helped create in recent years. Moderated by Professor Lee Branstetter, Director of the International Business Program at Columbia Business School.

Dr. Jeffrey L. Sturchio is Vice President, External Affairs, Human Health - Europe, Middle East & Africa at Merck & Co., Inc., in Whitehouse Station, New Jersey. He is responsible for the development, coordination, and implementation of a range of health policy and communications initiatives for the region. He has been centrally involved in Merck’s participation in the UN/Industry Accelerating Access Initiative to help improve HIV/AIDS care and treatment in the developing world. He is also a member of the private sector delegation to the Board of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria.

Dr. Sturchio received an A.B. in history (1973) from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in the history & sociology of science from the University of Pennsylvania (1981). His previous positions include the AT&T Archives, the Beckman Center for the History of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania, Rutgers University, and the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He has also been a Postdoctoral Fellow and Senior Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History (NMAH). In 2004 he was appointed a Visiting Fellow of LSE Health and Social Care at the London School of Economics and elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He joined Merck in June 1989 as the Company’s first Corporate Archivist. His publications include Chemistry in America, 1876-1976: Historical Indicators (Reidel, 1985; paperback edition, 1988), written with A. Thackray, P. T. Carroll, and R. F. Bud; Values & Visions: A Merck Century (Merck & Co., Inc., 1991); “Pharmaceutical firms and the transition to biotechnology: a study in strategic innovation” (with L. Galambos), Business History Review 72 (Summer 1998): 250-278; “Against: Direct to consumer advertising is medicalising normal human experience” (with S. Bonaccorso), British Medical Journal 324 (13 April 2002): 910-911; “Successful public-private partnerships in global health: lessons from the MECTIZAN Donation Program,” (with B. Colatrella), in The Economics of Essential Medicines, ed. by B. Granville (London: Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2002); and “Partnership for action: the experience of the Accelerating Access Initiative, 2000-04, and lessons learned,” in Delivering Essential Medicines, ed. by A. Attaran and B. Granville (London: Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2004).

 

Corporate & Securities Litigation Panel: Litigation In The New Era

Thursday April 7 at 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Jerome Greene Hall 103 at Columbia University.

This session will explore an insiders' view of today's challenges and trends in corporate and securities litigation, and discuss analyst independence, mutual funds, insurance industry investigations and cases.
Distinguished speakers: David D. Brown, Bureau Chief, Investor Protection and Securities Bureau, Office of the New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer; Carey R. Dunne, Partner, Davis Polk & Wardwell; and Melvyn I. Weiss, Partner, Milberg Weiss Bershad & Schulman. Organized by the Columbia Securities Law Association at Columbia Law School.

David D. Brown is Chief of the Investment Protection Bureau of the New York Attorney General’s Office. Prior to joining the office in May of 2003, Mr. Brown was an in-house litigation attorney at Goldman Sachs, Deutsche Bank and Bankers Trust. Before that, he worked as an associate at the firm of Davis Polk & Wardwell, and clerked for the Honorable William Wayne Justice of the Eastern District of Texas.

Carey R. Dunne is a member of Davis Polk & Wardwell’s Litigation Department. Most of the cases that Carey Dunne handles involve “parallel proceedings”: competing actions and investigations that must be defended simultaneously in multiple forums. His white collar criminal and regulatory matters have involved allegations of securities fraud, insider trading, antitrust violations, money laundering and other financial crimes.

Currently, Mr. Dunne is representing a large mutual fund complex and a Wall Street investment bank in connection with the highly publicized investigations of the mutual fund industry by the SEC, New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer and various other agencies. He is also representing Marsh & McLennan in the ongoing investigations of potential conflicts in the insurance broker industry. He represented Credit Suisse First Boston in the multiple investigations of “analyst independence” conducted by the SEC, the Department of Justice, the New York Stock Exchange, the NASD and the fifty state securities regulators; he also represented CSFB in the $1.4 billion industry-wide settlement of analyst independence issues, and in connection with the obstruction of justice trials of former banker Frank Quattrone. Mr. Dunne represented ImClone Systems in the criminal, Congressional and regulatory investigations of insider trading by Samuel Waksal and others; he also represented ImClone in connection with the obstruction of justice and securities fraud trial of Martha Stewart. He is also currently representing a senior executive of WorldCom in the Justice Department’s and SEC’s investigation of accounting fraud at that company. Mr. Dunne was a prosecutor in the Manhattan District Attorney’s office, conducting criminal investigations and trials, from 1984 to 1987.

Melvyn I. Weiss is a leading practitioner in the fields of securities, insurance, environmental, antitrust, and consumer litigation. His expertise has been recognized on numerous occasions by courts appointing him to leadership positions in prosecuting complex litigations. Among the more prominent of the outstanding recoveries in cases where he has represented defrauded investors are the Drexel/Milken litigations (recoveries of over $1 billion for investors in, among others, Columbia Savings & Loan and Executive Life Insurance Company of America); In re Washington Public Power Supply System Securities Litigation ($775 million recovered after the country's largest municipal bond default); Butcher Bank Litigation (leading to $400 million recovery on behalf of the FDIC against Ernst & Young); and Oxford Healthcare Securities Litigation ($300 million).

He was a pro bono lead counsel in the Swiss Bank Litigation involving Holocaust confiscations, which settled for $1.25 billion, and was a lead counsel in recovering $5 billion for Holocaust victims from German banks and companies. He is presently Chair of the Plaintiff's Executive Committee prosecuting over 300 cases involving misconduct in connection with initial public offerings, in which a partial settlement with some defendants of $1 billion has been announced.

 

IBS session – Corporate Investigations & White-Collar Crime

Monday March 21 at 5:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 333

Leslie Caldwell, currently a partner in the litigation practice at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP, was the former director of the Enron Task Force at the U.S. Department of Justice in 2002. As Director, Ms. Caldwell led a team of federal prosecutors, F.B.I. and I.R.S. agents in investigating the largest, most complex corporate fraud case in history. To date, the Task Force she assembled has indicted more than 30 individuals in connection with the scandal, including Enron’s former chairman Ken Lay and former CEO Jeff Skilling. In addition, the Task Force obtained the obstruction of justice conviction of former Enron auditor Arthur Andersen LLP.

In a June 14, 2004 article, The Washington Post reported Ms. Caldwell was one of the four attorneys most sought after by the nation’s top law firms. She was named one of Fortune magazine’s “People to Watch” in February 2003, and has been profiled in The New York Times, BusinessWeek, The Washington Post, the Houston Chronicle, and the San Francisco Chronicle, among others. From 1999 to 2002, Ms. Caldwell served as Chief of the Securities Fraud Section and Chief of the Criminal Division in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California, where she oversaw the prosecution of dozens of corporate and financial fraud cases. From 1987 to 1998, Ms. Caldwell worked in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York. As an Assistant U.S. Attorney, Ms. Caldwell successfully prosecuted some of the most notorious criminals of the past 17 years. In 1989, she put away a brutal drug kingpin who ordered the execution-style slaying of a 22-year-old rookie New York City police officer. She also exposed the influence of organized crime on Wall Street, obtaining numerous convictions in what some legal observers have called one of the most significant securities fraud cases ever filed. Ms. Caldwell also worked to rid New York’s Chinatown of gang violence, leading a series of prosecutions that crippled Asian organized crime groups in the city.

 

IBS session – Scenes from the Slippery Slope

Wednesday February 23 at 5:00 – 6:30 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 142

How will you handle the slippery slope? Actors from Decision Theater will present scenes of business life that pose dilemmas and challenge your values. The action stops and the audience chooses the course of action. Professors David Beim and Eric Abrahamson will lead discussions after each scene. The decisions are up to you in this interactive workshop.

Decision Theater is a group of professional actors who work with executives at all levels to dramatize personal decisions in corporate life. Their clients include GE, Boeing and many others.

 

IBS session – Securities Fraud & Corporate Governance at Symbol Technologies

Thursday January 27 at 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 142

Mark Greenquist '86, CFO and Peter Lieb, General Counsel will discuss the SEC investigation into allegations of securities fraud at Symbol Technologies from 1998 until early 2003. The SEC investigation, focusing on fraudulent accounting schemes, including manipulation of inventory levels, channel stuffing, use of “cookie jar” reserves, and fabrication of restructuring charges, led to the criminal indictment of 12 former Symbol executives and a $37MM civil penalty. The alleged accounting practices had a net impact of $230MM on reported revenue and $530MM on pre-tax earnings. Mr. Greenquist and Mr. Lieb will discuss the role of the new management team in cooperating with the SEC and navigating the company through the scandal. Both speakers will address the company’s experience within the context of broader corporate governance issues.

 

Individual Leadership and Personal Integrity: The Jonah Creigton Case

Friday January 7, 2005
Uris Hall, Room 142

Case discussion led by Professor Mike Feiner.

We’ve all read in the past few years about ethical lapses at Enron, WorldCom, Tyco, Parmalat, HealthSouth, Ahold, Skandia and AIG, to name just a few organizations where leaders have slid down a slippery slope. One lesson we can take from these examples is that acting on our values in the workplace requires skill as well as conviction, insight as well as courage, regardless of what level we are within the organization. The case deals with hiring practices, personal standards and convictions, organizational behavior and relationships with superiors and others within the organization, when one is not the CEO. This session challenges you to discover effective ways of dealing with moral dilemmas in the workplace, and explores questions including: How do you interact with others when you feel your personal values challenged? What issues arise in situations that deal with sensitive, ethical issues? How important is personal strategy and style to dealing with values-based situations?

 

Corporate Social Responsibility and the Bottom Line

Wednesday January 5 at 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Uris Hall, Room 301

Introduction by Paul Glasserman, Senior Vice Dean and Jack R. Anderson Professor of Business, Decision, Risk, and Operations Division.
Distinguished speakers: Scott MacLeod ’70, Managing Director of the Global Environment Fund; and Chris Beale, Managing Director of Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. Moderated by Geoffrey Heal, Paul Garrett Professor of Public Policy and Business Responsibility.

This IBS Orientation session explores the relationship between business and society and highlights how companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders. Topics include: Is acting in a socially responsible manner contrary to profits and the bottom line? What is the relationship between stakeholders and shareholder value? What are the social and environmental impacts of a company that business leaders are dealing with? What leadership issues arise in business conduct in emerging markets? What are the expectations that society has of business and business leaders and does this differ across national borders?

Chris Beale is a Managing Director at Citigroup where he is involved in investing private equity. Until recently he was global head of Citigroup’s infrastructure finance business. Chris grew up in Australia and obtained B.A. and LL.B. degrees from the University of Sydney and an MBA degree from Harvard Business School. Recently, he led a global initiative for the banking industry on a framework for managing environmental and social issues in international project development, called the Equator Principles.

Scott MacLeod ’70 is a Managing Director and serves on the investment committees of the Global Environment Fund. Mr. MacLeod has twenty-five years of experience in international project finance focused on establishing, acquiring, restructuring, privatizing and expanding private-sector companies and projects in developing countries. His transaction-oriented work has involved business development, project design and structuring, financial engineering and analysis, project evaluation and negotiation and management advice. Mr. MacLeod has worked in more than thirty countries in Eastern Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America with corporate executives and senior-level government officials. Prior to joining GEF, Mr. MacLeod was the Division Manager of the Privatization and Financial Advisory Group of the International Finance Corporation (IFC). While at IFC, his assignments included corporate restructuring, project structuring and financing, and cross-border mergers and acquisitions. Among others, he supervised the following projects: airlines in Kenya (Kenya Airways); heavy engineering in the Czech Republic (Skoda Pilsen); an electricity and water utility in Gabon, and electricity utilities in Pakistan (FAEB) and Panama (IRHE). Mr. MacLeod is a frequent speaker and chairman at conferences on privatization and private-sector participation in infrastructure, particularly on the subject of water utilities. He has most recently participated in such conferences in Dubai, Beijing, Vienna, Washington, New York, London, Singapore and Manila. Mr. MacLeod holds a BA from Yale University and an MBA from Columbia University Graduate School of Business.

 

Dean’s Panel: How High the Firewall? Separating Investment Banking from Research

Tuesday January 4, 2005 at 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 301

Introduction by R. Glenn Hubbard, Dean of Columbia Business School and Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics.
Distinguished speakers: Sallie Krawcheck ’92, CFO and Head of Strategy at Citigroup, Inc.; and Trevor Harris, Managing Director of Morgan Stanley and Co-Director of the Center for Excellence in Accounting and Security Analysis at Columbia Business School.

 

2014 Klion Forum

When: April 15th, 2014 6:00 PM-8:00 PM
Where: 3022 Broadway
Calder Lounge, Uris Hall (1st Floor)
New York, NY 10027

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Join Ms. Denise Morrison, CEO of Campbell Soup, and Ms. Ellen Kaden, chief legal and government affairs officer of Campbell Soup, for a fireside chat moderated by Professor Bruce Kogut on board governance and maintaining high ethical principles in a competitive market.

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Featured Video

Watch the trailer for our interactive debate entitled “Financial Innovation: A Risky Business?”

Featured Research

The Small Worlds of Corporate Governance
Identifies "structural breaks" — privatization, for example, or globalization — and assesses why powerful actors across countries behave similarly or differently in terms of network properties and corporate governance.

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Program Brochure

View the Bernstein Center brochure, Ethical Challenges in Business

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