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Bernstein: 2006 Events

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2006 Events

Social Compliance Standards, Ethical Sourcing, and Certification in Global Business: The Social Accountability International (SAI) Model

Wednesday, November 29, 2006 at 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Uris Room 326

Corporate Social Responsibility has become a buzz word around the world. Representatives from Social Accountability International, Eileen Fisher and Toys "R" Us will discuss their experiences with working to improve standards and accountability in sourcing and production.

Panelists: Tom DeLuca, Vice President of Imports and Compliance for Toys "R" Us; Amy Hall, Social Consciousness Director, Eileen Fisher Inc.; Phan Thi Hai Yen, Program Manager, Vietnam Office, Social Accountability International; with moderator Rainer Braun, Lecturer, School of International and Public Affairs.

Phan Thi Hai Yen is the Program Manager for the Vietnam Office of Social Accountability International (SAI), which helps to protect vulnerable factory workers, many of whom are young migrant women from the countryside. She advocates for the implementation of social responsibility standards for corporations and leads training sessions with the private sector, civil society, trade unions and government officials. Ms. Phan is currently participating in the Human Rights Advocates Program at the Center for the Study of Human Rights.

Amy Hall serves as Social Consciousness Director for women’s clothing designer Eileen Fisher, Inc. Ms. Hall is responsible for assessing and improving the workplace conditions in Eileen Fisher’s U.S. and Chinese factories, as well as guiding the socially responsible practices of the company. Social Consciousness is one of four values that inspire Eileen Fisher’s business practices. Ms. Hall serves on the Advisory Board of Social Accountability International, the Advisory Board of the Social Venture Network and the Board of the Greyston Bakery. Prior to joining Eileen Fisher, she held fundraising, managerial and teaching positions in various Asian-American and educational organizations. Ms. Hall's educational background includes a BA from Georgetown University and an MA from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Tom DeLuca is the Vice President of Imports and Compliance for Toys "R" Us, the world’s leading retailer of toys, children’s apparel and baby products. Toys "R" Us operates over 1595 stores throughout the world under the Toys "R" Us, Kids "R" Us, Babies "R" Us and Imaginarium names plus Toysrus.com, Babiesrus.com, Imaginarium.com and giftsrus.com web sites. He has over 30 years of retailing experience and has spent the last 20 years with Toys "R" Us in senior management positions. Tom is also responsible for the company’s benchmark toy safety compliance programs that he developed and implemented in 1989. In 1995, the company was honored by the Chairman of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission for its’ significant accomplishments in toy safety. His responsibilities also include the company’s comprehensive Code of Conduct for Suppliers program that he authored and implemented in 1997.In that same year Toys "R" Us was honored with "The Pioneer Award in Global Ethics" as a corporate conscience award winner by the Council on Economic Priorities (CEP). He is Chairman of Social Accountability International’s Advisory Board and a member of SAI’s Governing Board of Directors. Mr. DeLuca has been a frequent guest speaker and panelist at numerous conferences on Codes of Conduct, Responsible Business Practices and International Labor Standards.

Supported by the International Development Club, Bernstein Student Leadership and Ethics Board, Human Rights Working Group and the Center for the Study of Human Rights.

 

Business Careers and Corporate Social Responsibility

Tuesday November 28 at 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

Distinguished speakers: Mark Barenberg, Professor of Law at Columbia University; Jennifer Goralski, Assistant VP of Credit Suisse Americas Foundation; Melissa Powell, Project Manager at United Nations Global Compact; Valerie Cook Smith, VP of Environmental Affairs at Citigroup; and Sandrine Tesner, Managing Director of Renaissance Strategy LLC.

Moderated by: Dr J. Paul Martin, Executive Director of the Center for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University.

This event is co-sponsored by the Bernstein Student Leadership and Ethics Board and the Human Rights Working Group at SIPA.

 

Montrone Seminar – Kurt Hoffman with Professor Bill Duggan

Monday November 20 at 6:30 – 8:00 p.m.

The Paul M. Montrone Seminar Series on Ethics presents: Kurt Hoffman, Director of the Shell Foundation.

A development economist by training, Kurt Hoffman first practiced his craft in an academic context as a Senior Fellow at the Science Policy Research Unit at the University of Sussex in the UK and then worked at an advisory and operational level for private foundations as well as the UN, EU, the World Bank and various bi-lateral development agencies. A valuable grounding in the real world of raising investment capital and spinning off start-up businesses followed. In parallel with these activities, there was a prolonged period of work at board level to establish viable societal and customer value propositions to underpin airline industry support for the environment. This led to an invitation to join Shell Group in 1997 as architect and then Director of the Shell Foundation. Kurt was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 2003.

Supported by the Bernstein Student Leadership and Ethics Board, and the Social Enterprise Club.

 

Business Ethics + Corporate Governance = An Oxymoron?

Tuesday, November 14 at 5:30 – 8:00 p.m.

Business ethics and corporate governance are appearing in many more business school’s curricula and are now more important than ever to recruiters according to The Wall Street Journal‘s Top Business School’s survey of September 20, 2006. Executive greed, theft of corporate assets, backdating of stock options and other such acts have become very commonplace. Many people are finding it harder to trust business leaders, governmental leaders, religious leaders etc. Who can you trust today? Organized by the Columbia Business School Alumni Club of New York, Leadership and Professional Development Committee.

More information online.

Panelists include:
Gretchen Morgenson, Pulitzer Prize winning reporter from The New York Times, is an expert from the world of journalism. She is knowledgeable on the WHOs and the WHATs of Executive Compensation's uses and abuses. Her topic is The Good, The Bad and the Ugly in Executive and Board Compensation.

Executive Compensation Expert: Robert M. Siper, Esq. of McDermott, Will & Emery LLP recently moved there after retiring and bringing with him most of the compensation and benefits practice from KPMG where he was a partner for 26 years in charge of that area. Bob has consulted for many professional service firms, Fortune 100 companies as well as private company business owners.

Corporate Governance expert Russell S. "Trey” Reynolds III is President of The Directorship Search Group, a full service executive search firm with a specialty in recruiting independent directors to public boards and mutual funds. The firm also consults on compensation issues for corporate directors and advises both boards and director candidates on board compensation. Succession planning in the boardroom leads to strong corporate governance and guidance – this is in the best interest of all stakeholders.

 

IBS session – Morgan Stanley: The Aftermath of a Merger

Monday November 6 at 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

Professors Michael Keehner and David Beim will join Anson M. Beard Jr., Advisory Director of Morgan Stanley, John Coffee, the Adolf A. Berle Professor of Law at Columbia University, and Brad Hintz, Securities Industry Equity Research Analyst at Sanford Bernstein & Co., to discuss the recent events relating to the board and CEO at Morgan Stanley, and what implications this has for leadership and corporate governance in the financial industry. This panel will focus on questions concerning the importance of culture, leadership and integrity and the roles of board members, stakeholders, and senior executives in the field of corporate governance. This discussion is based on a new Columbia Business School case by Professor Michael Keehner, prepared with the assistance of Bobby Grant ’06 and Michael Ciolli ’06.

Anson McCook Beard, Jr. joined Morgan Stanley & Co. as a Vice President to found Private Client Services (PCS) in 1977. He was promoted to Principal in 1979 and Managing Director in 1980. In January 1981, he was put in charge of the Firm’s Equity Division, responsible for sales and trading relationships with institutional and individual investors of all equity and related products worldwide.

Mr. Beard was the former Chairman of Morgan Stanley Security Services Inc., a subsidiary of Morgan Stanley Group, which engaged in stock borrowing/lending, customer and dealer clearance, international settlements and custody. He served as a Trustee of the Morgan Stanley Foundation, and was a member of the Management Committee and the Inside Board of Directors of Morgan Stanley Group. He served as Vice Chairman of the National Association of Securities Dealers, and was Chairman of its NASDAQ Inc. subsidiary. In February, 1994, Mr. Beard retired and became an Advisory Director of Morgan Stanley.

Mr. Beard was born in New York City on March 31 1936. He graduated with a B.A. in American Studies from Yale University in 1958 and attended New York University Graduate School of Business. Prior to joining Morgan Stanley Mr. Beard spent four years as a junior lending officer at Citibank (1958 – 1962); 1962 –1973 at Laird, Inc. and three years as Chief Operating Officer at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette Securities Corp. (1974 – 1977).

John C. Coffee’s principal interests are corporations, securities regulation, class actions, criminal law, and white-collar crime, and is listed by the National Law Journal as one of "The 100 Most Influential Lawyers in the United States."

Following graduation from law school, Professor Coffee was a Reginald Heber Smith fellow for one year, working on poverty law litigation in New York City, before becoming a corporate lawyer with Cravath, Swaine & Moore from 1970-76. From 1976 until coming to Columbia in 1980, he was a professor at Georgetown University Law Center. He has been a visiting professor at Harvard Law School (2001), Stanford University Law School (1988), the University of Virginia Law School (1978), and the University of Michigan Law School (1979).

Professor Coffee is a member or former member of: Economic Advisory Board to Nasdaq; National Academy of Sciences panel studying empirical research on sentencing; the National Research Council's Standing Committee on Law and Justice; the Advisory Panel on Environmental Sentencing Guidelines to the United States Sentencing Commission; SEC Advisory Committee on the Capital Formation and Regulatory Processes; the Subcouncil on Capital Markets of the United States Competitiveness Policy Council; the Legal Advisory Board to the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD); and Legal Advisory Committee to the board of directors of the New York Stock Exchange. He was the former chairperson of the Section on Business Associations of the Association of American Law Schools, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

His publications include: Cases and Materials on Securities Regulation (with Seligman, 9th ed., 2003); Knights, Raiders and Targets: The Impact of the Hostile Takeover (with Lowenstein and Rose-Ackerman, 1988); Cases and Materials on Corporations (with Choper and Gilson, 6th ed., 2004); and Business Organization and Finance: Legal and Economic Principles (with Klein, 9th ed., 2004).

Charles B. (Brad) Hintz is the Equity Research Analyst covering the Securities and Asset Management Industries at Sanford Bernstein & Co. For the last four years he has been nationally ranked by Institutional Investor Magazine and by Greenwich Research Associates. Brad spent fifteen years on Wall Street serving for three years as the Chief Financial Officer and Managing Director of Lehman Brothers Holdings (NYSE: LEH) and for ten years at Morgan Stanley Group (Formerly NYSE: MS) as a Partner of that firm and its Treasurer. Prior to coming to Wall Street in 1986, Brad was Vice President and Treasurer of Anderson Clayton & Co (Formerly NYSE: AYL), a Fortune 200 Consumer Products Company. He also was Group Vice President at The Northern Trust Company (NYSE: NTRS) and served in various financial positions at Standard Oil of California (NYSE: CHV).

Brad holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Purdue University, a Master of Science degree from the University of Southern California, and a MBA from the Wharton School. Brad grew up in Edina, Minnesota. He is on the Deans Advisory Board of the Krannert School of Purdue University and on the Board of Advisors of the Marshall School of the University of Southern California. Brad is a Lieutenant Commander in the US Naval Reserve.

 

IBS / Silfen event – John Whitehead and Stephen Young, with Professor Paul Glasserman.

Wednesday October 25 at 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. 
Warren Hall

Steve Young, Global Executive Director of the Caux Round Table and author of Moral Capitalism, and John Whitehead, chairman of the Goldman Sachs Foundation, will examine the capitalist trends and how business can weigh both profit and principle. Moral Capitalism argues that ethical standards inherent in capitalism have been steadily compromised by shortsighted doctrines and cultural values that conflict with capitalism's egalitarian and rational spirit. The result has been what Young defines as brute capitalism, only interested in the narrowest definition of the bottom line approach to business decision making. It is this ideology that has led to a global backlash against capitalism, and the social ills we are witnessing today. Speakers will also discuss how the Caux Round Table's Seven General Principles for Business can serve as a blueprint for a new moral capitalism that can restore popular confidence, create wealth and end poverty, particularly in developing countries.

John C. Whitehead is Chairman of The Goldman Sachs Foundation. Mr. Whitehead began his professional career in 1947 at Goldman, Sachs & Co., where he worked for 38 years. He rose quickly within the company and was named Partner in 1956 and Co-Chairman and Senior Partner in 1976. He has served on the boards of numerous companies and as a Director of the New York Stock Exchange and Chairman of the Securities Industry Association.

In April 1985, Mr. Whitehead was asked to become Deputy Secretary of State, second-in-command to Secretary George Shultz, and he served until January 1989. During this period, he was Acting Secretary of State when Mr. Shultz was away from Washington and took a special interest in relations with Eastern Europe, the United Nations, and various administrative reforms in the State Department. Mr. Whitehead was awarded the Presidential Citizens Medal by President Reagan.

Since returning to New York in 1989, he has been active in a number of educational, civic, and charitable organizations. He is a former Chairman of the Board of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the United Nations Association, the International Rescue Committee, the Greater New York Councils of the Boy Scouts, International House, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Harvard Board of Overseers, Haverford College, and the Asia Society. He is also now a Director of the Nature Conservancy, Lincoln Center Theater, the East-West Institute, and the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships, and a former Director of Rockefeller University, the J. Paul Getty Trust, Outward Bound, and the National Humanities Center. In Washington, Mr. Whitehead is Chairman Emeritus of the Brookings Institution and the Trustees Council of the National Gallery of Art. He is also a member of the Caux Round Table’s World Advisory Council. In late 2001, he was appointed to chair the Board of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation.

Stephen B. Young is the Global Executive Director of the Caux Round Table, an international network of experienced business leaders who advocate a principled approach to global capitalism. Young has recently published Moral Capitalism, a well-received book written as a guide to use of the Caux Round Table ethical and socially responsible Principles for Business.

He came to Minnesota in 1981 to be the third dean of the Hamline University School of Law. Previously, he had been an Assistant Dean at Harvard Law School. Young has also taught at the University of Minnesota Law School, Vietnamese history for the College of Liberal Arts, University of Minnesota and Public Office as a Public Trust for Minnesota State University - Mankato.

Young is currently on the Board of the John Vessey Leadership Academy, a charter school in St Paul, Minnesota, and of Ready4K, an advocacy group promoting the benefits of early childhood education. He has served on the boards of the Citizens League, Resources for Child Caring, Vietnam's Women Memorial, Vietnam Social Service, Minnesota Sons of the Revolution and as Chair of United Arts in St Paul and the Minnesota Museum of Art. He is the founding board chair of the Center of the American Experiment. He was educated at Harvard College (graduating Magna Cum Laud) and Harvard Law School (graduating Cum Laud).

 

"Crossing Swords with Oligarchs: Profitable Investment and Economic Development in Emerging Markets"

Monday October 16 at 5:45 – 7:15 p.m.
Uris Hall

Distinguished speaker: William F. Browder, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Hermitage Capital Management; introduced by: R. Glenn Hubbard, Dean of Columbia Business School and Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics; and moderated by Charles Calomiris, Henry Kaufman Professor of Financial Institutions and Academic Director, Jerome Chazen Institute

William Browder is the Founder and CEO of Hermitage Capital Management, an investment advisory firm specializing in Russian equities with approximately $4 billion invested in Russia. Under Mr. Browder's leadership, the Hermitage Fund has produced total shareholder returns of 2,549% and has been ranked the World's Best Performing Emerging Markets Fund over a five-year period (1996-2001).

Mr. Browder is a leading shareholder rights activist and outspoken advocate of better corporate governance in Russia. He has been credited with a number of breakthroughs in improving corporate governance standards at major Russian companies, including Gazprom and Sberbank. He also spearheaded radical changes in Russian corporate law, including the creation of pre-emptive rights for all minority shareholders in Russian companies as well as the introduction of cumulative voting for director elections. Drawing upon his experiences in Russia, Mr. Browder will discuss the role played by investors in shaping the business environment, and implications for economic development.

This event is supported by: International Development Club, Columbia Investment Management Association, Central Eastern European Business Club, and Bernstein Student Leadership & Ethics Board.

 

IBS session – Unscripted. Unrehearsed. Real Life. Real Issues.

Tuesday October 10 at 5:45 – 7:00 p.m.
Uris Hall

Session led by Professor Mike Feiner.

What Would You Do...................?
“If your boss and your boss’ boss were to direct you to fire an organizational veteran of 18 years, a scant two months before he was set to retire, thereby preventing his benefits from maturing?”

OR

“If you were charged with reviewing and making a recommendation on a potentially attractive investment for your private equity fund employer, but you believed that the target – a sub-prime auto lender that targeted low income immigrants, often repossessing and “turning” the inventory multiple times – was unsavory or even ethically questionable?”

Many of you have and most of you will face dilemmas like these during your careers. To find out how best to grapple with these kinds of tough ethical issues, please join Professor Michael Feiner and members of the Class of 2008 for an interactive discussion based on the real-life experiences of your classmates. Sponsored by the Student Leadership and Ethics Board of the Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Center.

 

2006 Botwinick Prize in Ethics – Jim Sinegal

Friday October 6 at 1:30 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 301

The recipient of the 2006 Botwinick Prize, James Sinegal, President and CEO of Costco Wholesale Corporation, is the keynote speaker for the 2006 Social Enterprise Conference. In 1983 Mr. Sinegal cofounded Costco Wholesale Corporation, a warehouse-club retailer which is also known for its best practices in employee benefits, and for leadership in setting executive compensation. Mr. Sinegal has 40 plus years of merchandising and operations experience in the retail mass merchandising field.

 

IBS session – Ethical Best Practices in the Consulting Industry

Thursday September 14 at 6:00 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 142

Rich Lesser, Senior Vice President and head of the New York office at Boston Consulting Group (BCG) and Onur Erza '01, Associate Partner at McKinsey and Co. discuss their firms' commitment to ethical practices and the leadership challenges consultants face in a highly competitive and visible industry. This session will be moderated by Professor Hitendra Wadhwa. Organized by the Management Consulting Association and Bernstein Student Leadership and Ethics Board.

Rich Lesser, senior vice president and director, leads BCG’s New York office. He joined The Boston Consulting Group in 1988, after receiving an MBA from Harvard Business School and working at BCG as a summer intern in 1987. Rich is a graduate of the University of Michigan, where he majored in chemical engineering. Before business school, he worked as a project engineer and group leader for Procter & Gamble in product development. Since joining BCG, Rich has supported clients in a variety of industries including pharmaceuticals, consumer goods, retailing, paper manufacturing, high tech, and consumer electronics. He is currently global client team leader for a top pharmaceutical company and is a member of BCG's Office of the CEO.

Onur Erzan '01 is an Associate Principal with the Corporate Finance practice of McKinsey and Co. in New York.

 

Corporate Social Responsibility and the Bottom Line

Thursday August 24 at 9:30 a.m.
Miller Theater

This IBS Orientation session is supported by the Citigroup Foundation.

Introduction by Paul Glasserman, Senior Vice Dean of Columbia Business School and Jack R. Anderson Professor of Business, and Director of the Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Center for Leadership and Ethics.
Distinguished speakers: Eric Eve, Senior Vice President of Community Relations, Citigroup Global Consumer Group; Dotti Hatcher, Senior Director of Social & Community Investment, Gap Inc.; and Peter Knight, President of Generation Investment Management.
Moderator: Geoff Heal, Paul Garrett Professor of Public Policy and Business Responsibility.

This IBS session explores the relationship between business and society and highlights how companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders. Topics include: Is acting in a socially responsible manner contrary to profits and the bottom line? What is the relationship between stakeholders and shareholder value? What are the social and environmental impacts of a company that business leaders are dealing with? What leadership issues arise in business conduct in emerging markets? What are the expectations that society has of business and business leaders and does this differ across national borders?

Eric Eve: Eric is responsible for coordinating community outreach strategies across GCG businesses (Citibank, Citi Cards, CitiMortgage, and CitiFinancial) to ensure that Citigroup’s vast array of resources is leveraged to strengthen communities in 100 countries where Citigroup has a presence. In addition, Mr. Eve is a member of the GCG Planning Group.

Prior to joining Citigroup in March 2004, Eric served as Vice President of Government Relations for Verizon Communications. His primary responsibilities included managing Verizon’s federal legislative efforts as principal lobbyist before the United States Senate, and coordinating efforts to establish a national broadband policy. In addition, he managed the public policy relationship between Verizon and its labor unions.

Before joining Verizon, Eric served as Special Assistant for Political Affairs to President William Jefferson Clinton. In that capacity he advised the President on political matters focused on the Northeastern United States and issues related to African Americans nationally. Prior to his work with the Clinton Administration, he served as Director of Intergovernmental Relations for New York State Comptroller, H. Carl McCall, where he managed legislative matters between the Office of the State Comptroller and the New York State Legislature, Governor’s Office, and Congressional Delegation. Eric holds degrees from Hobart College and the Graduate School of Political Management, City University of New York.

Dotti Hatcher: Dotti joined Gap Inc. in 1984 as Manager of International Freight Forwarding and Customs Clearance. Over the course of her 20+ years with the company, she has held several different positions, all of which have been international in scope. Prior to assuming her current CSR role in November of 2004, Dotti headed Gap Inc.’s corporate foundation and Community Relations organization. In this role she managed the philanthropic giving and charitable activities of the corporation, as well as the development and implementation of all Gap Inc. employee volunteer programs, which include the corporation’s matching gifts program.

From 1994–1999 Dotti served as Director of Gap Inc.’s Global Compliance organization and was co-author of Gap Inc.’s current Code of Vendor Conduct, which is used to monitor manufacturing facilities around the world. In 1996, Dotti spearheaded the implementation of one of the retail industry’s first Independent Monitoring programs which, well known throughout the NGO community, has been recognized as an early model for successful corporate, NGO, government and worker collaborations in developing countries.

In her current role Dotti manages social and community investment strategies and program funding in Gap Inc.’s sourcing communities throughout the developing world. Dotti has traveled extensively in more than 45 countries worldwide, and continues to spend more than 70% of her time in developing countries where Gap Inc. has offices or a manufacturing presence.

Peter Knight: Generation Investment Management is a Global Equities Asset Management Firm, founded in 2004, that integrates sustainability research into a fundamental equity process.

Peter started his career with the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice. From 1977 to 1989, he served as Chief of Staff to Vice President Al Gore when Mr. Gore was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives and later the U.S. Senate. Peter served as the General Counsel of Medicis Pharmaceutical from 1989 to 1991, and then established his law practice representing numerous Fortune 500 companies as named partner in a Washington D.C. law firm. Peter has held senior positions on four presidential campaigns, including serving as the Campaign Manager for the successful 1996 re-election of President Clinton. Peter was a Managing Director of MetWest Financial, a Los Angeles based financial services company from 2001 to 2003.

Peter currently serves as a director of Medicis Pharmaceutical, Entremed and Par Pharmaceutical. He is also a director of Schroder’s mutual fund and hedge fund family, a member of the Cornell University Council and the Cornell University Advisory Board for the College of Arts and Sciences. Peter holds a B.A. degree from Cornell University and a J.D. degree from Georgetown University Law Center.

 

Dean’s Panel: Corporate Governance

Monday August 21 at 2:00 p.m.
Lerner Hall

This IBS Orientation session is supported by the Citigroup Foundation.

Introduction by R. Glenn Hubbard, Dean of Columbia Business School and Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics.
Distinguished speaker: Leon G. Cooperman ’67, Chairman and CEO of Omega Advisors, Inc.
Panel discussion with Bernstein Leadership and Ethics Board members: Ro Malik '07 and Jon Gordan '06.

This IBS session will focus on the role of business leaders, investors, and regulators in the field of corporate governance: What importance are investors placing on good corporate governance? How should boards and companies’ senior executives interact to ensure a high standard of corporate integrity and governance? In a post Sarbanes-Oxley environment, how is the relationship between and distribution of rights and responsibilities of auditors, boards, executives, employees, shareholders and other stakeholders changing and does this differ across countries (such as Germany)? How effective have ‘gatekeepers’ (auditors, ratings agencies, legal advisors etc) been in safeguarding shareholder value? What role should shareholders play in improving the accountability of boards and CEOs?

Leon G. Cooperman: After 25 years of service, Lee retired from his positions as a General Partner of Goldman, Sachs & Co. and as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Goldman Sachs Asset Management at the end of 1991 in order to organize a private investment partnership, under the direction of Omega Advisors, Inc. At Goldman Sachs, Lee spent 15 years as Partner and from 1990 to 1991, and as Counsel to the Management Committee. In 1989, he became Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Goldman Sachs Asset Management and was Chief Investment Officer of the equity product line including managing the GS Capital Growth Fund, an open-end mutual fund, for one and one-half years. Prior to those appointments, Lee spent 22 years in the Investment Research Department as Partner-in-charge, Co-Chairman of the Investment Policy Committee and Chairman of the Stock Selection Committee. For nine consecutive years, Lee was voted the number one portfolio strategist in the Institutional Investor All-America Research Team survey.

As a designated Chartered Financial Analyst, Lee is a senior member and past President of the New York Society of Security Analysts. Lee is a member of the Board of Overseers of Columbia Business School, a member of the Board of Directors of Automatic Data Processing, Inc., a Trustee of Saint Barnabas Hospital, and Chairman of the Saint Barnabas Development Foundation, serves on the National Board of Trustees of the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, Inc., a member of the Board of Directors of the Cancer Research Fund of the Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Foundation, and a member of the Investment Committee of the Museum of Modern Art. Lee received his MBA from Columbia University and his undergraduate degree from Hunter College.

 

Klion Forum – Dan Reingold with Professors Eli Noam and David Beim

Wednesday July 19 at 6:30 – 9:00 p.m.
Columbia University
 

The KPMG Peat Marwick / Stanley R. Klion Forum presents: Dan Reingold with Professors Eli Noam and David Beim.

Dan Reingold was a Managing Director and telecom analyst at Morgan Stanley, Merrill Lynch and Credit Suisse First Boston for fourteen years. He was ranked number one or number two by Institutional Investor magazine for most of his career. Prior to that he was a financial executive at MCI. He has been profiled in Barron's, frequently quoted in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, and Business Week, and interviewed on TV, including CNBC and Wall Street Week with Louis Rukeyser. Reingold is currently Project Director for Telecom Finance at the Columbia Institute for Tele-Information at Columbia Business School, and is co-author of "Confessions of a Wall Street Analyst...What Eliot Spitzer Never Told You".

Eli Noam has been Professor of Economics and Finance at the Columbia Business School since 1976. In 1990, after having served for three years as Commissioner with the New York State Public Service Commission, he returned to Columbia. He is the Director of the Columbia Institute for Tele-Information. CITI is a university-based research center focusing on strategy, management, and policy issues in telecommunications, computing, and electronic mass media. In addition to leading CITI's research activities, Noam initiated the MBA concentration in the Management of Media, Communications, and Information at the Business School and the Virtual Institute of Information, an independent, web-based research facility. His books and articles include a series on global telecommunications and volumes on international film and television, media concentration, electronic banking and the cybermedia of the future.

David Beim joined Columbia Business School’s faculty after a 25-year career in investment banking. His work experience includes 10 years in corporate finance at First Boston, where he founded and ran the project finance group, two years as executive vice president of the Export-Import Bank of the United States, 10 years as head of investment banking at Bankers Trust Company and three years as a partner at Dillon Read. He teaches corporate finance, international banking and emerging financial markets, and in 1995 he received the Dean’s Award for Teaching Excellence. Professor Beim is a Bernstein Center Faculty Leader and serves as coordinator for the business ethics theme in the curriculum. His research interests include debt pricing and the banking industry.

This event is co-hosted by the Columbia Institute for Tele-Information and the Student Leadership and Ethics Board of the Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Center.

 

IBS session – Unscripted. Unrehearsed. Real Life. Real Issues.

Thursday June 8 at 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 301

Session led by Professor Mike Feiner.

What Would You Do...................?
“If your boss and your boss’ boss were to direct you to fire an organizational veteran of 18 years, a scant two months before he was set to retire, thereby preventing his benefits from maturing?”

OR

“If you were charged with reviewing and making a recommendation on a potentially attractive investment for your private equity fund employer, but you believed that the target – a sub-prime auto lender that targeted low income immigrants, often repossessing and “turning” the inventory multiple times – was unsavory or even ethically questionable?”

Many of you have and most of you will face dilemmas like these during your careers. To find out how best to grapple with these kinds of tough ethical issues, please join Professor Michael Feiner and members of the Class of 2007 for an interactive discussion based on the real-life experiences of your classmates. Sponsored by the Student Leadership and Ethics Board of the Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Center.

 

Inspired Business Speakers – Robert Ouimet

Wednesday April 18 at 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 326

While business schools generally focus on WHAT an individual can accomplish, Dr. Robert Ouimet ’61, chairman and CEO of O.C.B Inc. and Ouimet-Tomasso Inc, will explore WHY business leaders achieve. We live in a world of increasingly ambiguous business ethics. Some individuals, however, have been able to stand their ground in defense of their own values. It is these individuals we hope to showcase to serve as inspiration for the future global business leaders.

Dr Ouimet is on the board of the Council of Canadian Chief Executives, Petro-Canada and the National Bank of Canada. He is a knight of the Sovereign and Military Order of Malta; Order of the Guardians of Mount Zion and the Holy Sepulcher (Jerusalem); Order of Canada and Ordre national du Québec. Dr Ouimet was inspired by Mother Teresa and her deeds for the poor and sick, which intrigued him to visit her. They developed an immediate kinship, lasting until her death in 1997. He returned home with her prayer and incorporated these values into the company’s mission.

This event is jointly sponsored by the Student Leadership and Ethics Board of the Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Center, Jewish Business Students Association, Muslim Business Students Association, South Asian Business Association, and Young Arab Leaders Association. Please RSVP to Shervin Setareh.

 

Montrone Seminar – Josephine Linden

Tuesday April 11 at 8:00 – 9:30 a.m.

The Paul M. Montrone Seminar Series on Ethics presents: Josephine Linden, Partner, Goldman, Sachs & Co. This roundtable discussion with MBA students will cover a myriad of topics from Josephine’s 23 year tenure at the Firm. Josephine is currently is the Regional Manager of the New York Private Wealth Management Division and was the former Head of Global Equities Compliance. She will discuss issues of leadership and ethics at Goldman Sachs, corporate governance and work life balance. Please RSVP to Kim Karetsky. (This event is now full).

 

IBS session – Decision Theater’s Values-based Leadership Workshop

Wednesday April 5, 2006 at 5:00 p.m.
Uris Hall

Discussion led by Professor David Beim. Executive Development Concepts runs Decision Theater sessions for executive leaders in Fortune 500 companies including GE, Deloitte, Citigroup, Pfizer and BP. Join this interactive session with an actor’s troupe, who will role play a real-life situation, which will ask you to choose the course of action.

 

Montrone Seminar – David Gebler

Thursday March 30 at 8:00 – 9:30 a.m.

The Paul M. Montrone Seminar Series on Ethics presents: David Gebler, president and founder of Working Values. This roundtable discussion will focus on the issue of corporate culture as a risk factor and how principle-based leadership is the key to maintaining high levels of integrity in organizations. Download Culture Risk, Working Paper (pdf). Please RSVP to Cindy Bo. (This event is now full).

 

Curriculum Development Workshop with Mary Gentile

Friday March 17 at 10:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 329

Columbia Business School, in collaboration with The Aspen Institute Business & Society Program and Mary C. Gentile, Ph.D., invites interested Columbia MBA students to participate in a Curriculum Development Workshop based on a forthcoming elective seminar: “Values In Action: A Leadership Practicum”. This workshop is designed to provide a taste of the proposed seminar curriculum and to elicit feedback on its design and content. Students will learn from the successful leadership strategies employed by business leaders who have contributed to the development of the curriculum and share their own experiences, helping to ensure that the ultimate seminar is practical, relevant and tailored to Columbia MBA students.

 

IBS session – Corruption and Emerging Markets

Thursday February 23, 2006 at 5:00 p.m.
Warren Hall, Room 207

Discussion led by Professor Ray Fisman. Professor Fisman is known for his innovative research on corruption and international development. He teaches the elective course "Business Strategies in Emerging Markets".

 

IBS session – Spring screening of Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room

Wednesday February 15, 2006 at 5:00 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 142

Post-film discussion led by Professor Mike Feiner.
“…Writer-director Alex Gibney takes a notorious tale of corporate greed and plays it as Greek tragedy, Texas-style….By focusing his documentary on the people behind the Enron scandal — their foibles, follies and moral frailty — Gibney takes a potentially dry, daunting topic and turns it into something eminently compelling.” – The Associated Press review.
More reviews are available online. Business School students, faculty and staff are welcome.

 

Individual Leadership and Personal Integrity: The Jonah Creigton Case

Friday January 6, 2006 in Uris Hall
Case discussion led by Professor Mike Feiner.

This IBS Orientation session is supported by the Citigroup Foundation.
We’ve all read in the past few years about ethical lapses at Enron, WorldCom, Tyco, Parmalat, HealthSouth, Ahold, Skandia and AIG, to name just a few organizations where leaders have slid down a slippery slope. One lesson we can take from these examples is that acting on our values in the workplace requires skill as well as conviction, insight as well as courage, regardless of what level we are within the organization. The case deals with hiring practices, personal standards and convictions, organizational behavior and relationships with superiors and others within the organization, when one is not the CEO. This session challenges you to discover effective ways of dealing with moral dilemmas in the workplace, and explores questions including: How do you interact with others when you feel your personal values challenged? What issues arise in situations that deal with sensitive, ethical issues? How important is personal strategy and style to dealing with values-based situations?

 

Corporate Social Responsibility and the Bottom Line

Thursday January 5 at 9:00 a.m.
Uris Hall, Room 301

This IBS Orientation session is supported by the Citigroup Foundation.

Introduction by Paul Glasserman, Senior Vice Dean of Columbia Business School and Jack R. Anderson Professor of Business, and Director of the Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Center for Leadership and Ethics.
Distinguished speakers: Ingrid Dyott of Neuberger Berman; David Schilling of the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility; and Kevin Thurm of Citigroup.
Moderator: Ray Horton, Frank R. Lautenberg Professor of Ethics and Corporate Governance and Director of the Social Enterprise Program.

This IBS session explores the relationship between business and society and highlights how companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders. Topics include: Is acting in a socially responsible manner contrary to profits and the bottom line? What is the relationship between stakeholders and shareholder value? What are the social and environmental impacts of a company that business leaders are dealing with? What leadership issues arise in business conduct in emerging markets? What are the expectations that society has of business and business leaders and does this differ across national borders?

Ingrid Dyott: For the past nine years, Ingrid has been an integral part of Neuberger Berman’s socially responsive group. She is a Managing Director and Portfolio Manager on the Socially Responsive Investing (SRI) Team. Neuberger Berman’s SRI team manages a 5-star Morningstar rated fund (as of 6/30/05) and separate accounts for both individuals and institutions. Ingrid is responsible for financial, social and environmental analysis for the SRI product. As part of the Socially Responsive Investment Group, Ingrid is responsible for social and environmental analysis for all of the socially responsive portfolios and the Neuberger Berman Socially Responsive Mutual Fund. She works closely with clients to help translate social and environmental concerns into practical investment guidelines. In addition Ingrid is an associate portfolio manager of Neuberger Berman’s Guardian Fund.

Before joining the firm in 1997, she was a research analyst at the Council on Economic Priorities; a non profit research organization focusing on corporate social and environmental responsibilities. Ingrid received a BA from Bowdoin College and an MBA from Columbia Business School. Ingrid is actively involved in the SRI community through various functions and speaking engagements. She is a steering committee member of the Social Investment Forum’s Research Analyst Network.

David Schilling: David is program director for the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility, a coalition of 275 Catholic, Jewish and Protestant organizations. For ten years, David has worked with ICCR members and associates on a range of global corporate accountability issues including human rights and labor rights in the contract supplier system. David, a United Methodist minister, has participated in delegations to Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam and China visiting factories and meeting with workers and non-governmental organizations. David was a member of the Independent Monitoring Working Group for six years which supported independent monitors at Gap supplier factories in El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala and was a member of President Clinton's Anti-Sweatshop Task Force.

He currently is a member of the Coalition for Justice in the Maquiladoras, the Kenan Institute's Global Corporate Social Responsibility Study Group and a member of the International Advisory Network of the Business and Human Rights Resource Centre, chaired by Mary Robinson, former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. David graduated from Carroll College, Union Theological Seminary, Columbia University (International Fellows Program) and received an advanced professional studies degree from Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, CA.

Kevin L. Thurm: Since September 2005, Kevin has worked with Lew Kaden, Chief Administrative Officer of Citigroup, serving as a point of contact for senior management throughout the company. Previously he served as the Chief of Staff to Bob Willumstad, President and Chief Operating Officer of Citigroup from October 2003 through August 2005. Beginning in February 2001, Kevin served as the Director of Consumer Planning in Citigroup’s Global Consumer Group. In that role, he focused on a number of areas, including community relations, Citigroup’s Hispanic market initiative, diversity and compliance.

Prior to joining Citigroup, Kevin was the Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) from 1996-2001, serving as the Department’s chief operating officer, working on all major policy and management issues. Beginning in January 1993, Kevin was HHS chief of staff, serving as a principal advisor to Secretary Donna E. Shalala and as the central point of liaison between the Department and the White House as well as other departments and agencies. During 1992, Kevin worked on the Clinton for President and Clinton-Gore 92 campaigns. From 1989-1991, he was an associate with the New York law firm of Cahill Gordon & Reindel. Kevin, a former Rhodes scholar, received a B.A. from Tufts University, a B.A./M.A. from Oxford University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

 

Dean’s Panel: Corporate Governance

Tuesday January 3 at 2:00 p.m.
Uris Hall, Room 301

This IBS Orientation session is supported by the Citigroup Foundation.

Introduction by R. Glenn Hubbard, Dean of Columbia Business School and Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics.
Distinguished speakers: Chris H. Browne, Managing Director of Tweedy, Browne Company LLC; and Leon G. Cooperman ’67, Chairman and CEO of Omega Advisors, Inc.

This IBS session will focus on the role of business leaders, investors, and regulators in the field of corporate governance: What importance are investors placing on good corporate governance? How should boards and companies’ senior executives interact to ensure a high standard of corporate integrity and governance? In a post Sarbanes-Oxley environment, how is the relationship between and distribution of rights and responsibilities of auditors, boards, executives, employees, shareholders and other stakeholders changing and does this differ across countries (such as Germany)? How effective have ‘gatekeepers’ (auditors, ratings agencies, legal advisors etc) been in safeguarding shareholder value? What role should shareholders play in improving the accountability of boards and CEOs?

Christopher H. Browne joined Tweedy, Browne Company LLC, a registered investment advisor, in 1969. Chris is a managing director of Tweedy, Browne Company, LLC and is a member of the firm's management committee. He is also President of the Tweedy, Browne Funds, a mutual fund group comprised of the Tweedy, Browne Global Value Fund and the Tweedy, Browne American Value Fund.

Chris is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania where he serves as a Charter (Life) Trustee. He is a member of both the executive and investment committees of Penn's board. At Penn, he established the Browne Center for International Politics, and the Browne Distinguished Professorships in the School of Arts and Sciences. He is also a trustee of The Rockefeller University, a leading bio-medical research institution, and serves on its executive committee and as chair of its trustee nominating committee. Chris has spoken frequently on the topic of behavioral psychology and financial decision making, and formerly served on the faculty advisory committee of Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government program in Investment Decisions and Behavioral Finance. Chris is a trustee of Guild Hall, a regional arts and education center in East Hampton, NY, and of the Long Island Chapter of the Nature Conservancy.

Leon G. Cooperman: After 25 years of service, Lee retired from his positions as a General Partner of Goldman, Sachs & Co. and as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Goldman Sachs Asset Management at the end of 1991 in order to organize a private investment partnership, under the direction of Omega Advisors, Inc. At Goldman Sachs, Lee spent 15 years as Partner and from 1990 to 1991, and as Counsel to the Management Committee. In 1989, he became Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Goldman Sachs Asset Management and was Chief Investment Officer of the equity product line including managing the GS Capital Growth Fund, an open-end mutual fund, for one and one-half years. Prior to those appointments, Lee spent 22 years in the Investment Research Department as Partner-in-charge, Co-Chairman of the Investment Policy Committee and Chairman of the Stock Selection Committee. For nine consecutive years, Lee was voted the number one portfolio strategist in the Institutional Investor All-America Research Team survey.

As a designated Chartered Financial Analyst, Lee is a senior member and past President of the New York Society of Security Analysts. Lee is a member of the Board of Overseers of Columbia Business School, a member of the Board of Directors of Automatic Data Processing, Inc., a Trustee of Saint Barnabas Hospital, and Chairman of the Saint Barnabas Development Foundation, serves on the National Board of Trustees of the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, Inc., a member of the Board of Directors of the Cancer Research Fund of the Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Foundation, and a member of the Investment Committee of the Museum of Modern Art. Lee received his MBA from Columbia University and his undergraduate degree from Hunter College.

 

Financial Innovation: A Risky Business?

Watch the trailer for our interactive debate exploring the value of financial markets, the interaction between government and innovation, and what role markets should play in society.

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This event was presented by Fred Friendly Seminars in partnership with the Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Center for Leadership and Ethics, and was part of Columbia Business School’s Individual, Business and Society (IBS) curriculum.

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2014 Klion Forum

When: April 15th, 2014 6:00 PM-8:00 PM
Where: 3022 Broadway
Calder Lounge, Uris Hall (1st Floor)
New York, NY 10027

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Join Ms. Denise Morrison, CEO of Campbell Soup, and Ms. Ellen Kaden, chief legal and government affairs officer of Campbell Soup, for a fireside chat moderated by Professor Bruce Kogut on board governance and maintaining high ethical principles in a competitive market.

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Featured Video

With rapidly changing consumer tastes, many food companies are looking to expand their markets at home and overseas. How does an iconic American company stay relevant?

Featured Research

The Small Worlds of Corporate Governance
Identifies "structural breaks" — privatization, for example, or globalization — and assesses why powerful actors across countries behave similarly or differently in terms of network properties and corporate governance.

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Program Brochure

View the Bernstein Center brochure, Ethical Challenges in Business

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