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Data Overview

We have collected student subgroup- and school-level data that State Education Agencies use to determine whether schools met Adequate Yearly Progress in the 2002-03 and 2003-04 school years. The data include variables for whether the school made Adequate Yearly Progress overall as well as the percentage of students within each subgroup that took the math and reading tests, the percentage that scored proficient and above, and whether these percentages met that states’ Annual Measurable Objectives. The data also include the number of tested students per subgroup. Proficiency and participation rates are typically not reported if a subgroup’s size falls below the state’s minimum requirement.

On the Files and Documentation page we post national data files for each school year (2002-2003 and 2003-2004) in STATA format. In addition, we post separate data files for each state and year in both Excel and Stata formats. A Word document accompanies the national files and each of the state and year files that contains descriptions of each variable and its data source. The tables below describe the naming conventions for the variables contained in the state data files. Read the printable version (pdf) of the naming conventions.

Naming Conventions For 50-State Standardized AYP Variables

Table 1 (below) reports our abbreviations for various reporting levels, and table 2 (below) reports our naming conventions for each variable in our 50-state database. Please note that the level of data disaggregation varies by state. For instance, one state may disaggregate its data by subject, group, and level; another state may only disaggregate by subject and group. In addition, states have some flexibility in choosing groups to report. Please visit either the national or state-specific codebook for state-by-state data details.

Variable reporting levels for Subject (s) Group (g) and Level (l)
Click image to enlarge. See text version.

Variable name, variable label, and variable value naming conventions
Click image to enlarge. See text version.

Contact Us

Randall Reback, Barnard College
Jonah Rockoff, Columbia Business School
Heather Schwarz, RAND Corporation
Elizabeth Davidson, Teachers College

Funding

This work was funded by grants from the Spencer Foundation (200900082) and the Institute for Education Sciences (R305A090032).

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