February 18, 2014

Two Columbia Business School Professors Awarded 2014 Sloan Research Fellowships


NEW YORK—Columbia Business School is pleased to announce that two distinguished economists, Ilyana Kuziemko and Emi Nakamura, have been selected as 2014 Sloan Research Fellows. The fellowships are awarded annually to early–career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as next–generation leaders in their respective fields. Professor Kuziemko and Nakamura join only eight researchers to receive this year’s fellowships in economics.

“We are extremely proud to have two honorees this year, building on Columbia’s culture of academic excellence,” said Glenn Hubbard, dean of Columbia Business School. “Emi and Ilyana are brilliant thought leaders and their groundbreaking research influences and continues to shape the field of economics.”

Professor Kuziemko studies how government institutions impact inequality. Kuziemko served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic Policy at the US Treasury, where she worked mostly on the development and early implementation of the Affordable Care Act, and continues to examine policy implications in public economics.

Professor Nakamura’s research focuses on the empirical underpinnings of macroeconomics, international economics, and industrial organization. As a fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a research affiliate of the Center for Economic Policy Research, and on the technical advisory committee for the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Nakamura’s work is already making an impact on federal data policy.

“For more than half a century, the Sloan Foundation has been proud to honor the best young scientific minds and support them during a crucial phase of their careers when early funding and recognition can really make a difference,” said Dr. Paul L. Joskow, President of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. “These researchers are pushing the boundaries of scientific knowledge in unprecedented ways.”

The Sloan Research Fellowships are awarded in eight scientific and technical fields—chemistry, computer science, economics, mathematics, evolutionary and computational molecular biology, neuroscience, ocean sciences, and physics. Candidates are nominated by fellow scientists, and winning fellows are then selected by an independent panel of senior scholars on the basis of a candidate’s independent research accomplishments, creativity, and potential to become a leader in his or her field. Each fellow receives $50,000 to further their research.

For more on the Sloan Research Fellowships, please visit www.sloan.org/sloan-research-fellowships.

To learn more about the cutting–edge research being performed by Columbia Business School faculty members, please visit www.gsb.columbia.edu.

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About Columbia Business School

Columbia Business School is the only world–class, Ivy League business school that delivers a learning experience where academic excellence meets with real–time exposure to the pulse of global business. Led by Dean Glenn Hubbard, the School’s transformative curriculum bridges academic theory with unparalleled exposure to real–world business practice, equipping students with an entrepreneurial mindset that allows them to recognize, capture, and create opportunity in any business environment. The thought leadership of the School’s faculty and staff, combined with the accomplishments of its distinguished alumni and position in the center of global business, means that the School’s efforts have an immediate, measurable impact on the forces shaping business every day. To learn more about Columbia Business School’s position at the very center of business, please visit www.gsb.columbia.edu.