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May 5, 2006

Dean Glenn Hubbard to Deliver University Lecture on May 9

In a University Lecture scheduled for Tuesday, May 9, Dean Glenn Hubbard will discuss how the MBA has contributed to the growth of American business and to entrepreneurial capitalism worldwide.


In a University Lecture scheduled for Tuesday, May 9, Dean Glenn Hubbard will discuss how the MBA has contributed to the growth of American business and to entrepreneurial capitalism worldwide.

The dean, who is also the Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics, will describe how business schools have helped spur growth by increasing productivity. The University Lecture is hosted once a semester by President Lee C. Bollinger and Provost Alan Brinkley, who select speakers to highlight leading Columbia faculty and their recent achievements.

“Our greatest companies became more productive by having managers and entrepreneurs who knew how to integrate the best technology with new business models,” Hubbard says. The breeding ground for new business models is the “cross-disciplinary intellectual conversation” going on within top business schools today.

The speech, “Business, Knowledge and Global Growth,” will be delivered at 6 p.m. in Low Library. The president and provost have invited executives and leaders from the pubic and private sectors, as well as University faculty members, administrators and students, to join them for the lecture.

From February 2001 to March 2003, Hubbard served under President George W. Bush as chairman of the U.S. Council of Economic Advisers, where his responsibilities included advising the president on economic policy, tax and budget policy, international finance and environmental policy, among other issues. He became dean of Columbia Business School in July 2004.

From cultivating theoretical advances in pricing options to the latest in management theory, business schools have become “growth’s lobbyists,” he says. “The abilities to think strategically and to value opportunity are teachable, and business schools’ connection between research and industry offers the right classroom.”