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Privacy Policy

Columbia Business School respects the privacy of your personal information and does not, under any circumstances, rent or sell personal information submitted by visitors to our site to any outside third party.

Columbia Business School collects personal information to make our site(s) and service(s) more relevant and rewarding for you to use.

For each visitor to our web pages, our web server automatically recognizes your domain, service provider, operating system, and Internet browser. Our web server additionally records usage of pages by our visitors. We use this information, in aggregate, for our research reports and performance surveys. We sometimes use this non-personally identifiable information that we collect to improve the design and content of our site and to enable us to improve the user’s overall internet experience.

Personal information that you submit to this website will be used only for the purpose for which it was asked (for example, information submitted on the Admissions section of our website will be used for admissions purposes). Aggregate, nonpersonally identifying information may be both used internally and shared externally (for example, the number of applicants from specific countries).

We may use a third-party tracking service that uses JavaScript to track non-personally identifiable information about visitors to our site in the aggregate. The information we track is limited to usage and volume statistics and is used to provide insight into the effectiveness of our online marketing initiatives and strategies.

To enhance and personalize your experience, some of our web pages use “cookies.” Cookies are text files that your web browser places on your computer’s hard drive to store your preferences. When using cookies, we do not store personally identifiable information within the cookie.

Some of our site(s) and service(s) contain links to other sites whose information practices may be different than ours. Visitors should consult the other sites’ privacy policies as we have no control over information that is submitted to, or collected by, these third parties.

The School is committed to upholding our community members’ and visitors’ right to privacy. Should you have any questions or suspect a breach of these policies, we encourage you to contact the School’s Information Technology Group by e-mail at Talk2ITG@gsb.columbia.edu. Further information on Columbia University’s overarching online privacy and network use policies is available on the Academic Information Systems website.

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