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Resources

The Grid

The Research Grid at the Columbia Business School is 25+ node, 300+ CPU Linux grid and cluster environment dedicated to supporting academic research and computing. The Business School's Research Grid provides access to powerful computational tools including; Matlab, Sas, Stata, R and Python on a platform vastly more powerful than can be found on any desktop. Users may run interactive or batch jobs with access to large data sets, fast disk space, RAM multiple CPU cores, and GPU capability. Users may access the Grid via a secure-shell or nxclient for a desktop-like environment. Grid utilization may be viewed via ganglia and users can receive a confirmation email at job completion.

Additional information regarding using the Research Grid can be found on our wiki: http://wiki.gsb.columbia.edu/research

Hardware:

  • 30 total nodes (392 cores)
  • 1 Tesla M2070 GPU (488 cores)
  • Each node has either 8, 12 or 16 Intel Xeon Cores
  • Each node has either 32, 96, or 192 GB RAM
  • EMC Isilon Shared Storage with 10GB connectivity
  • Physically separate storage network • Red Hat Linux 6.4 x86_64
  • Redundant power and cooling

Software:

  • OS: Red Hat Enterprise Linux
  • Job Control: Sun Grid Engine v6.2 u5
  • C/C++/Java/Fortran Compilers
  • CPLEX
  • GAUSS
  • Julia Programming Language
  • Mathematica
  • MATLAB
  • Python
  • R/Revolution R
  • Rstudio IDE
  • SAS
  • STATA
  • Stat/Transfer

Databases

The University, the School, the Libraries, and Centers have collected and purchased a wealth of data that can help faculty to address many research questions across disciplines. Issues pertinent to School databases are dealt with by the School's Databases Committee.

Faculty members and doctoral students who would like to request access to a database not currently available at Columbia Business School should follow the procedure outlined in the Policy for Requesting New School-Funded Databases.

 

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The Curl Ideas to wrap your mind around

Sowing Startup Success

Owen Davis ’08, managing partner of NYC Seed, doesn't believe people are born with a startup gene. "Anyone can launch," Davis says. "There’s a process that will minimize the silly mistakes new entrepreneurs make.”

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A Storyteller Goes Back to School

Amanda Kinsey ’12 has produced a film about Columbia University's storied past.

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Why Creative Destruction Has Bypassed India

The frenzy that has accompanied the introduction of the iPhone 6 is a perfect example of creative destruction, a phenomenon that's a key measure of dynamic growth. In India, it's in short supply.

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Four Moves That Would Transform India

Arvind Panagariya sets an agenda for India's new leader during the inaugural event of Columbia Business School’s new India Business Initiative.

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Unlocking the Value of Movable Assets

Can a simple change to commercial laws in emerging economies spur business growth?

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Startups for a Better World

More and more alumni entrepreneurs are launching ventures to serve the greater good.

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You Say You Want a Revolution

The editor of The Economist traces three revolutions that upended society as we know it, and explains why a fourth revolution within the next ten years is unavoidable.

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Power Isn't Enough: Study Reveals the Missing Link for Effective Leadership

New research from Columbia Business School shows that powerful leaders fail to listen properly and take others’ accounts into perspective, jeopardizing the impact they could have

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NBA Commissioner David Stern Awarded 2014 Botwinick Prize

David Stern, the commissioner emeritus of the National Basketball Association, was awarded the 2014 Botwinick Prize in Business Ethics during a ceremony on Tuesday, September 9 at Uris Hall.

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