Meyer Feldberg

Meyer Feldberg ’65
Senior Advisor, Morgan Stanley, New York

Meyer Feldberg served as dean and professor at Columbia Business School for 15 years. He received a BA from the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa, an MBA from Columbia Business School, and a PhD from the University of Cape Town. He has been a visiting professor at the Cranfield School of Management in England, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management, and INSEAD in France.

After graduating from Columbia, Professor Feldberg was employed by the B.F. Goodrich Company in Akron, Ohio. In 1972, he was appointed dean of the University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business. In 1979, he became director of executive education and associate dean at Northwestern University’s J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management. In September 1981, he was appointed dean of Tulane University’s A.B. Freeman School of Business, and in 1986 he became president of the Illinois Institute of Technology.

In 1989, Professor Feldberg returned to Columbia as professor of management and dean of the Business School. In 2003, he was named the Sanford C. Bernstein Professor of Leadership and Ethics and held the chair until 2007. He stepped down as dean in June 2004 and was appointed dean emeritus.

Professor Feldberg is a director of Macy’s, Primedia Inc., Revlon, Inc., Sappi Limited and UBS Funds. He is the author of a number of articles and books, including Organization Behavior: Text and Cases.

In 2007, Mayor Michael Bloomberg appointed Professor Feldberg president of New York City Global Partners. He works with the mayor’s office on New York City’s relationships with 40 other global cities.

Professor Feldberg, who participated in numerous international swimming meets in the late 1950s and 1960s, is a keen sportsman who especially enjoys skiing and hiking. He serves on the board of the New York City Ballet, the world’s premier company. He is married to Barbara, an artist, and has two married children and six grandchildren.