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Paul B. Guenther

Paul B. Guenther ’64
Retired President, PaineWebber Group, Inc., New York

Paul Guenther was president of PaineWebber Group, Inc., the parent company of PaineWebber Incorporated, until his retirement in 1995. Since then he has focused on the nonprofit sector. He was appointed chairman of the New York Philharmonic in September 1996. From 1998 to 2004, he served as chairman of Fordham University, where he continues as a board member.

He serves on the board of directors of the Guardian Life Insurance Company and its affiliate, RS Investments.

Mr. Guenther earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from Fordham University in 1962 and an MBA in finance from Columbia Business School in 1964. In the same year, he began his career as a credit analyst with Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co. He joined PaineWebber Incorporated in 1966 as a securities analyst and served in a variety of positions. In 1984, when the company realigned its three principal subsidiaries into one, Mr. Guenther became chief administrative officer responsible for administrative services, operations, and systems. He assumed responsibility for the firm’s retail sales business in 1987 and for investment banking activities in mid-1988. In late 1988, he was named president of PaineWebber Incorporated, and in 1994, president of PaineWebber Group, Inc.

Mr. Guenther was a 2005 recipient of an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Fordham University and the 1992 recipient of an honorary LLD from Concordia College. His organizational associations include Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, director; Lenox Hill Hospital, vice chairman; Frost Valley YMCA, chairman; Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust, trustee; Cristo Rey New York High School, board of directors; and the Governor’s Committee on Scholastic Achievement, trustee. He is a former director of the Securities Industry Association and a former president and director of Columbia Business School’s Alumni Association. He is a member of the Institute of Chartered Financial Analysts.

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