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Tracey T. Travis

Tracey T. Travis ’86
EVP and Chief Financial Officer, The Estée Lauder Co., Inc., New York

Tracey Travis was named executive vice president of finance and chief financial officer of the Estee Lauder Companies effective August 20, 2012. Previously Ms. Travis was senior vice president of finance and chief financial officer at Ralph Lauren from January 2005 to July 2012, with responsibility for worldwide corporate finance, inclusive of accounting, financial planning and analysis, treasury, and tax and business development, as well as investor relations and information technology. During her tenure, Ms. Travis led work related to the acquisitions of licensed brands/geographies with a focus in recent years on Asian markets, capital structure efforts, strategic business plans, investor relations strategies, and a major global systems transformation.

Ms. Travis served on the board of Jo-Ann Stores Inc (JAS) for eight years until the company was sold to private equity investors in March of 2011, and chaired the JAS Audit Committee for four years. She currently serves on the boards of the Campbell Soup Company (CPB), the Lincoln Center Theater, and the Women’s Forum of New York. She is also a trustee on the board of the University of Pittsburgh. Ms. Travis is a former member of the Advisory Board for the Program for Financial Studies at Columbia Business School.

Ms. Travis was recognized in 2005 by Treasury and Risk Management magazine as one of the top 25 women in finance and in 2012 as one of the 100 most influential people in finance. In 2008 she was granted the Best CFO Award by Institutional Investor magazine. In 2009 she was named one of the top 100 African-Americans in corporate america by Black Enterprise magazine. In 2009, Ms. Travis also received a Distinguished Alumni Award from her alma mater, the University of Pittsburgh. In 2011, Ms. Travis was asked to serve as an inaugural member of the Wall Street Journal’s CFO Forum.

Ms. Travis received a bachelor of science in industrial engineering from the University of Pittsburgh and an MBA from Columbia Business School.

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