The ergonomics of dishonesty: The dffect of incidental expansive posture on stealing, cheating and traffic violations

The ergonomics of dishonesty: The dffect of incidental expansive posture on stealing, cheating and traffic violations


Coauthor(s): Andy J. Yap, Abbie S. Wazlawek, Brian J. Lucas, Amy J. C. Cuddy, and Dana R. Carney
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Abstract
Can the structure of our everyday environment lead us to behave dishonestly? Four studies found that expansive postures incidentally imposed by our ordinary living environment lead to increases in dishonest behavior. The first three experiments found that individuals who engaged in expansive postures were more likely to steal money, cheat on a test, and commit traffic violations in a driving simulation. We also demonstrated that participant’s sense of power mediated this effect. The final study found that automobiles with more expansive driver’s seats were more likely to be illegally parked on New York City streets. These findings are consistent with research showing that (a) postural expansiveness leads to a psychological and physiological state of power, and (b) power leads to corrupt behavior.

Exact Citation:
Andy J. Yap, Abbie S. Wazlawek, Brian J. Lucas, Amy J. C. Cuddy, and Dana R. Carney "The ergonomics of dishonesty: The dffect of incidental expansive posture on stealing, cheating and traffic violations." 2281-2289, (2013): 2281-2289.
Volume: 2281-2289
Pages: 2281-2289
Date: 2013