Financial Services

Augustus Haney
MBA
Class of 2017
Program Details: 
Full-Time MBA
Hometown or Country: 
Born in MD; grew up in Washington, DC
Previous Education: 
BS in economics from NYU, 2009
Previous Work Experience: 
I worked as a sponsor's agent and project manager in New York's residential development sector
Post-CBS Goals: 
Working in real estate private equity investing and development
CBS Activities: 
Chair of Cluster Z'17; member of the Real Estate Association, Private Equity Club, Sailing Club, and Ski Club
Favorite NYC Activities: 
Met Opera, the Cloisters, MoMA, biking in Central Park, film festivals, theatre at BAM, and new restaurants

 

Why did you apply to business school?

I previously worked in real estate, on the development side. As I progressed, I became interested in working in real estate finance. I knew I needed to enhance certain skill sets and qualifications in order to do that. I also wanted to build my network, both within real estate and outside of it. The MBA was the best route to accomplish this.

 

What specifically attracted you to Columbia Business School?

I was attracted first and foremost by the location. Wanting to work in real estate, I knew I wanted to be in a major real estate market. I also thought about the network I would like to have, and New York is where the business leaders are. It’s the center of the universe in terms of the real estate business. You can easily take the subway to meet for coffee with the principal of a major real estate fund or developer, which is something you can’t do on an isolated campus. That’s why Columbia was my top choice.

 

What were your first impressions as a student?

I think there is a misconception that MBA students are cookie-cutter — that they look the same, dress the same, and that they are all going into finance. I was amazed by the incredible diversity I found here. People come from nonprofits, government, and military. There’s also tremendous ethnic and geographic diversity. Everyone has their own story, and it’s been a surprising gift to have access to this.

 

What have you enjoyed the most about the academic experience?

The best part of the academic experience has been the guest speakers. These people are the top players in their particular industries — just listening to them, you know that they know what they’re talking about. You get to hear about their deals and areas of interest, and knowing what they are doing right now makes you feel very connected to the business community. I don’t think this access would be possible anywhere else.

 

How did you become involved in the community?

I entered in the January term and became tightly knit with my cluster. As the year progressed, and people started taking electives, I became more involved with clubs, including the Real Estate Association and the Private Equity Club. Clubs allow you to seek out people with common interests as well as expand your circle. I went on a trip with the Real Estate Association, and now I consider it to be almost like a second cluster to me, and have formed some of my closest connections there.

Yuta Yamada
MBA
Class of 2017
Program Details: 
Full-Time MBA
Hometown or Country: 
Born and raised in Tokyo; lived in New York City from ages seven to 12
Previous Work Experience: 
I worked for Goldman Sachs in Tokyo in the investment banking division
Post-CBS Goals: 
Working in a finance role for a consumer-retail company in New York
CBS Activities: 
VP of international, Student Government Executive Board; member of Peer Advisors, General Management Association, Private Equity Club, and Basketball Club    
Favorite NYC Activities: 
Attending professional sports games, jogging in Central Park, trying new bars and cafes  

 

What have you enjoyed the most at Columbia Business School?

Columbia does a great job integrating academics and the real world of business. Being in New York, you can step out to see what’s really happening — how the theory you’re studying is applied. It also works the other way around, where you can take what you’re learning and apply it through internships. That’s been the greatest thing about Columbia so far.

 

What’s it like to be a student in New York City?

I come from Tokyo, but I lived in New York from age seven to 12. I’ve always had a strong connection to New York. There are so many opportunities to pursue. Outside of school, there are Yankees games, musicals, museums — all sorts of non-academic activities. There are a lot of opportunities around campus to enjoy, too, and lots of classmates live nearby. It’s been a great experience.

 

Why did you choose to begin the program in January, as a J-term student?

I originally applied for the fall term. But through talking to the admissions office, I learned about the January-term option, and it seemed like a fit for me. We began in January and took classes together through the summer, instead of taking the summer off for full-time internships. I come from banking and knew I was interested in finance, so the accelerated program made sense to me. It’s shorter, but it has the same curriculum as the two-year program, and you really bond with your classmates. There’s also flexibility, which allowed me to intern outside of class. It was a good balance.

 

What are your thoughts on the curriculum?

The core curriculum was really good for me. I came from finance, and I didn’t know much about areas like marketing and operations. I did some of this as an undergrad, but it was really good to brush up on it, especially now that I’ve had work experience. The electives are good, too, and they provide a lot of variety.

 

How have you been involved in the student community?

I serve on student government as VP of international. About 40 percent of MBA students are international, and for the January term, more than 60 percent are international. One of my missions is to smooth the transition for international students into and out of Columbia Business School. I have worked with the offices of student affairs and admissions to create arrival packages containing practical information on opening bank accounts, finding housing, and using public transportation. I also seek out ways to support international students’ job searches in the U.S.  Many of us will work in a globally-integrated environment after graduation, and I believe planning international cultural events and using case studies on non-U.S. companies in classes can help all Columbia Business School students to think more globally .

 

What will you take with you?

I have gained confidence. I will return to the working environment better able to influence change by supporting my thoughts with logic, especially when challenged about my views. I’d like to look back and say, “Hey, I went to Columbia Business School, and I learned that every view counts.” 

 

Related:
The Jerome A. Chazen Institute for Global Business

 

Daniel Eguche
EMBA
Class of 2015
Program Details: 
EMBA New York
Hometown or Country: 
Abuja, Nigeria
Previous Education: 
BS in electric engineering from Howard University, summa cum laude
Current Work: 
Fund Manager of Compass Frontier Partners, LP
Post-CBS Goals: 
I plan to further my simultaneous goals of delivering superior risk-adjusted returns to our investors, while spurring the development and stability of frontier capital markets that will, in turn, provide capital for growth-constricted businesses and reduce reliance on public funding. In my spare time, I hope to compete in the New York Golden Gloves championship, venture to new locales on my motorcycle, and learn French.
CBS Activities: 
Columbia Student Investment Management Association, African Business Club, EMBA Hermes Society
Favorite NYC Activities: 
NYC encapsulates many of my favorite things with its plethora of options for delectable food, museums, theaters, and speakeasies. If I started a day with a run through Central Park, then stopped by Buvette for brunch, followed by a stroll on the High Line, then sought visual amazement at the MoMA, followed by a quick visit to The Campbell Apartment right before dinner at Carbone, I would consider it a marvelous day.
Areas of Interest: 

Why Columbia Business School? 
In my desire to pursue investing more seriously, I started to read more on the topic and discovered value investing. It seemed at once simplistic and logical, and I grew rather obsessive about learning more. Columbia Business School remains the preeminent institution for value investing — I can’t think of a better place to go if you're serious about it. That made CBS the obvious choice for me. 

How does being in New York City help you with your career goals?
In the past three or four months, I have listened to or spoken directly with Bob Bruce, Bill Ackman, David Einhorn, Henry Kravis, and Michael Price. These are some of the legendary value investors in the field, and they're on campus so frequently. They can give you creative advice and tell you what to do and what to avoid. I think you just have rare access.

What class are you most excited about, or what class has been most helpful to you in your current work role?
I’ve benefitted immensely from strategy courses with Bruce Greenwald, investing lectures by Tano Santos, bankruptcy and LBO courses with Michael Grad and Margaret Cannella, and many others. If I had to pick one, however, it would be Applied Value Investing with Tom Tryforos. The practical nature of the course made it incredibly beneficial, albeit quite demanding as well. He treated the entire class like investment professionals and encouraged us to engage in what should be the requisites of sound and well-deliberated investing. I took a lot of his recommendations to heart, and I expect the learnings from the course will stick with me throughout my investing career.

What has been your favorite experience at CBS?
While there are several strong contenders, I would rank the international seminars to Shanghai and Rio de Janiero as my favorite experiences. Being able to wed my love for travel and foreign cultures with the knowledge gained from studying the intricacies and challenges of foreign businesses left me with a broader perspective and greater appreciation for those parts of the world. The fact that all of this was undertaken with a group of friends, and combined with a sampling of different cuisines and visits to many of the world’s must-see sights, made it that much more enjoyable.

What's been the most surprising thing about being at CBS?
I came into the program with a preordained plan to focus on value investing, which remained true throughout. However, I decided to stray beyond my comfort zone and took several courses on behavioral finance, entrepreneurship, personal leadership, and management. To my surprise, the non-quantitative courses had a remarkable impact on my mindset and personal development, as well as my approach to conflicts and resolutions. It’s refreshing that CBS provides such a well-balanced program, and I encourage all to exploit the myriad of options and resources to their utmost.

What does it mean to you to be part of the Columbia Business School community?
I consider it a real privilege, not due just to what I've gotten so far, but what I think will still remain available once I graduate. I've been surrounded by very highly regarded professors who have a deep passion for their subjects. I also now count as friends accomplished yet still very ambitious professionals in various industries. I have access to a very diverse student population, and I've met people with all sorts of ideas that grant a varied and often unconsidered perspective on different subjects. There's a very extensive network, and I think it will only continue to grow.  

How does the School’s entrepreneurial approach help you with your career goals?
It's been absolutely pivotal. Thus far, I've studied a plethora of businesses through case studies, company filings, and analyses of business plans. Learning about their keys to success, and the unique approach of the entrepreneur or the management team in each case, has been very elucidating. More important is that in a lot of these cases, professors encouraged us to focus on missed opportunities and potential pitfalls. Being at the helm of a young fund, these sorts of exercises have been most useful for me and have spurred a greater sense of confidence in my ability to maneuver through challenges in the coming years. 

Once you have your CBS degree, how will you apply it to your current role and beyond?
I'm fortunate to be able to combine my fervent passion for investing with my ardent interest in the burgeoning landscapes of frontier markets, particularly Africa. While I cannot dismiss the significant impact luck has had on my journey thus far, I believe my opportunities to gain a thorough education have been just as meaningful. Ergo, I cannot think of a better way to arm the marginalized than with a similarly sound education. Looking ahead, I believe education will continue to be integral in raising standards of living and planting a ladder for the less privileged to emerge from the depths of abject poverty, and I hope to launch or support causes striving towards this goal. I also believe that the eradication of poverty in these frontier markets will be supported by efficient and transparent capital markets, and I hope that my involvement there will continue to foster the necessary steps towards meaningful progress.

Alex Malorodov
MBA
Class of 2016
Program Details: 
Full-Time MBA
Hometown or Country: 
Born in Moscow; moved to Washington, DC, in 1998 at the age of 12
Previous Education: 
BS in electrical engineering from University of Maryland, 2009; MS in electrical engineering from Johns Hopkins University, 2011
Previous Work Experience: 
I worked for Apple as a strategic deals manager, served as a consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers, and was a project manager for BAE Systems, a global defense, aerospace, and security company
Post-CBS Goals: 
Working in venture capital in New York
CBS Activities: 
Officer for the Rugby Team and the Sailing Club, member of the Private Equity/Venture Capital Club and Retail & Luxury Goods Club
Favorite NYC Activities: 
Strolling in Central Park, taking in the architecture of the city, going out in the meatpacking district
Areas of Interest: 

What is it like to go to business school in New York City?
The access is unparalleled; the fact that you can hop in the subway and meet pretty much anywhere in the city within half an hour really gives you options to explore different careers — more so than any other city, in the US or elsewhere, would.

What has been your favorite experience at CBS?
I took a Personal Leadership and Success class, and we had a weekend retreat. In the span of two days, I felt closer to that entire class than some of my friends whom I've known for 10 or 15 years. Regardless of background, I realized that each person I go to school with has a story that will bring you to your knees. We're all in a similar position. It drove home the value of developing empathy for others.

What's been the most surprising thing about being at CBS?
Despite everyone’s success and achievements to date, the level of humility is astounding. Everybody's equally willing to contribute to the class and help mentor you or tutor you. There's no ego floating around, which was very surprising to me.

How does being in New York City help you with your career goals?
Within a month of starting school, I was able to get a school-year internship, which I attribute largely to being in the city and close to my employer’s office. Working has helped me gain exposure to the Venture Capital scene in New York and differentiate myself during interviews for summer internships. NYC lends itself to the networking required to secure a VC job — I can take a same-day meeting downtown and be back in time for class.

Once you have your CBS degree, how will you conquer the world?
I enjoy mentoring people. Besides helping entrepreneurs shape the world we live in, I would like to at some point become a motivational speaker, either as a hobby or as my primary job. Having gone through the journey from chasing resume bullets to understanding what core values drive me and what makes me happy, I hope to inspire others to follow their heart rather than money and to live life for experiences.

Temitope Fawibe
MBA
Class of 2016
Program Details: 
Full-Time MBA
Hometown or Country: 
Lagos, Nigeria
Previous Education: 
BS in economics from the University of Houston and BBA in finance from the University of St Thomas
Previous Work Experience: 
Project coordinator at Shepherd Oilfield Services
Post-CBS Goals: 
To combine my interests in banking and social enterprise and work in social finance
CBS Activities: 
Columbia Women in Business Association, African Business Club

"The School will be at the center of training, molding, and guiding the world's next generation of social innovators."

I'll be going into banking after Columbia Business School, and I feel that in the future there will be an increased focus on and commitment to corporate social responsibility. Companies have a responsibility, not only to their businesses but also to the communities in which they operate. These companies, including major banks, have the resources to affect positive social and environmental change. 

Columbia Business School has already demonstrated a dedication to training business leaders with a focus on social impact. Programs like the Tamer Center will only continue to grow and develop. The School will be at the center of training, molding, and guiding the world's next generation of social innovators.

Related:
The Tamer Center for Social Enterprise

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Fall 2015 Cross-Registration Dates

  • A-term, B-term, and Full-term electives: 10:00 am on Thursday August 20th until 4:00 pm Tuesday September 8th.
     
  • B-Term electives: 10:00 am Wednesday October 21st until 4:00pm Wednesday October 28th.